Skip to content

502 Comments

  1. Duelene Olson
    January 16, 2014 @ 8:28 pm

    Thank you for helping others in the midst of your own challenges.

    Reply

    • sally schiefer
      January 19, 2014 @ 2:31 pm

      ~ OMG! ** 3 months ago I put my batteries in a International Coffees’ tin next to my computer, later I smelled something odd. Luckily I searched with my nose and found that the tin with the AA and AAA batteries was finger-blistering hot and so were the other batteries in it smelling like a chemical fire. 2 batteries were upright and touching both the bottom & top of the tin causing them to heat up! I am so thankful My HOUSE didnt’ BURN down. PLEASE DON’T STORE YOUR BATTERIES IN METAL CONTAINERS! TAPE THE POSTS OF YOUR 9-VOLTS! PLEASE COPY & PASTE THIS! Save a life ~Sally Schiefer

      Reply

      • Jan
        January 20, 2014 @ 5:25 pm

        Are we not supposed to have any voltage loose batteries stored together, or is only 9V batteries? I have lots of AA and AAA batteries stored together that may still have a little charge left in them.

        Reply

        • Brian
          January 21, 2014 @ 4:41 pm

          To be absolutely safe you should cover the terminals on any loose batteries. It is less likely that something like this would happen with AA, AAA, C, or D style batteries, but I’ve heard of cases where they were stored in a drawer with keys or other items that shorted them out as well.

          Reply

        • carl
          January 23, 2014 @ 7:31 am

          The terminals of AA, AAA, C, and D batteries are at opposite ends from each other. It’s virtually impossible for both ends of the same battery to accidentally contact the same conductor. I wouldn’t worry about it at all.

          Reply

        • Joan
          January 24, 2014 @ 6:08 am

          Thank you for info. I had NEVER HEARD this type of information. Will bo going to RTadio Shack or Home Depot soon.

          Reply

        • DanD
          January 25, 2014 @ 8:56 pm

          9V are the worst because both terminals are on the same end. This makes it very easy for them to short, with both making contact with a metal container.

          However, any batteries can do so, especially if they’re tossed randomly in a container such that several form a circuit.

          Reply

        • Jay
          January 26, 2014 @ 4:57 pm

          dont forget to properly dispose of them at your local E-Waste disposal drop, most have a small cardboard box in the giant can for small batteries, do not send them to the land fill or drop them in a garbage can cause they off gas and leak lead and other horrible chemicals in the landfill that eventually make it into water systems.

          Reply

        • Joanne Lord MacLeod
          January 28, 2014 @ 11:25 am

          All we do here in our community {and I’m assuming the rest of Canada} is take our used batteries into the larger grocery stores ,where they have large blue plastic garbage containers marked for used batteries . I have seen our local firemen picking up same while there . They collect them regularly .

          Reply

      • Cheryl
        January 24, 2014 @ 7:13 pm

        I’ve learned to listen to that still small voice and after seeing your video, I went to my kitchen “junk” drawer. Yup, found a 9 volt, one AA and two AAA batteries hanging out with all sorts of stuff – including two lighters. Were they used? Don’t know, don’t care. Took some tape and wrapped the ends (one of the AAA was looking a bit bulgy) and tossed them in the trash. Sorry, dear environmentalists, there are few recycling places here, and they do not include batteries. We’re in a mobile home and in the few minutes it took for that garage to go up in flames, our entire home would be gone. Thanks for sharing your story – no matter how slim the chance (as I’ve heard people say), I will not take the chance.

        Reply

    • Randy
      January 20, 2014 @ 7:44 pm

      Wow, very simple solution! Keep new batteries in original packaging, and throw away old batteries!

      Reply

      • Wendell
        January 21, 2014 @ 12:09 pm

        Randy, one should be recycling the old batteries and not letting them go to a landfill. That’s why they are in a container, probably waiting for recycling.

        Reply

        • Karen
          January 21, 2014 @ 5:25 pm

          Wendell: Do you know where I can recycle used batteries?

          Reply

          • Shawna
            January 23, 2014 @ 7:47 am

            Our local waste disposal website says to throw them in the trash; disposal options vary from place to place.

          • leo
            January 23, 2014 @ 11:38 am

            You can go to any homedepot store…they do have recycling box for old batteries and even for light bulbs

          • Morgan
            January 23, 2014 @ 12:07 pm

            Best Buy normally has battery recycling

          • Janet
            January 23, 2014 @ 5:54 pm

            Radio Shack takes batteries for free. Home Depot only takes rechargeable batteries.

          • Lo
            January 23, 2014 @ 7:08 pm

            So we could accidentally burn down Best Buy, Radio Shack, & Home Depot by throwing our old batteries in their collection box?

          • Allen
            January 24, 2014 @ 9:38 am

            Better then your house right? I have worked in a Bestbuy, they got a box in the back and thats where the batteries go in, they can be shorted out vary easily. Best way to stop that from happening is to have a little light bulb and solder wires to it and hook them to the 9v battery, same with AAA and AA, you can get battery pack holders from Radio shack and just let the light bulb shine till it shines no more and if they make contact with another battery, there isn’t enough juice to even make it warm.

          • Jerry
            January 24, 2014 @ 3:15 pm

            I took a boxful of old batteries to the local fire department for disposal. They had no clue what to do with them, and suggested I throw them in the trash. Well, that was helpful.

          • Ed
            January 25, 2014 @ 12:59 pm

            Don’t get down on firefighters. It’s not a recycling center.

          • David
            January 27, 2014 @ 12:33 am

            Recycle centers accept old batteries. Most retailers accept larger rechargeable batteries that are no longer holding a charge. If they sell them they must accept them for recycling.

        • Paula
          January 23, 2014 @ 9:35 pm

          Actually, the newer AA and AAA batteries can now be thrown in the trash. They no longer contain mercury. Just make sure you check your package to see if you have the newer type without mercury.

          Reply

        • An
          January 23, 2014 @ 11:10 pm

          Costco batteries come in packages with multiple batteries together…once the pkg is opened the batteries can come loose and roll around together in the drawer…:/

          Reply

        • Danielle
          January 24, 2014 @ 6:15 am

          EPA just changed this law/rule. They don’t recycle small batteries any longer, they tell you to just throw them away now.

          Reply

        • b
          January 25, 2014 @ 7:37 pm

          recyclers do not want your AA, AAA, c, or D batteries – they say they are safe to throw in regular trash- so there is no need to collect old batteries at all

          Reply

        • Steven
          January 26, 2014 @ 1:24 pm

          My experience is the same as the other posters. I recently took old batteries to my local fire station where we recycled our batteries for years. I was told that they no longer accepted the because batteries no longer had to be recyled and that we should just throw them away.
          Frankly, Wendell, if you have tried to recycle a battery in the past few years, you would know that.

          Reply

        • Terri
          February 9, 2014 @ 5:32 am

          We tape the ends of our batteries, store them in a plastic jar, and recycle at the landfill weekly.

          Reply

      • Tracy
        January 23, 2014 @ 5:28 pm

        Please dispose of batteries properly. They aren’t environmentally friendly and should never be thrown out with trash. Check with your town recycling center, ours has a drop box for batteries.

        Reply

        • Bill
          January 23, 2014 @ 11:35 pm

          Tracy, that’s incorrect. Only rechargeable batteries and button cells need to be recycled.

          The battery that set the guy’s house on fire was a plain old disposable alkaline battery. Modern alkaline batteries are not particularly hazardous and can go in the regular trash.

          Apparently there are places that accept alkaline batteries for recycling, but I’ve never seen one. Places like Home Depot, Best Buy, and the past 3 towns I’ve lived in say they only accept rechargeable batteries and button cells. If you give alkaline batteries to a place that doesn’t specifically handle them, they’ll probably just take them out of the box and throw them in the trash.

          Reply

          • Jake
            July 30, 2014 @ 7:38 am

            Bill, while you’re totally correct in that newer alkaline batteries (actually since 1996 I believe) contain almost untraceable amounts of mercury and hence present no eminent environmental hazard… the merits of recycling alkaline batteries are in my opinion extremely worthwhile. The current U.S. based recycling facility that has the capacity to process alkaline batteries boasts a 93% recovery of initial materials. Battery recycling processes are in their adolescent stages yet and with possible legislature in 2015 mandating the collection and recycling of primary use batteries by the producers of those batteries (at least in the states which, honestly, doesn’t produce as other countries but it’s a start) the whole industry could see a boom, right? I think we as a society should shift towards become sustainable, and when recycling steel could be 70% more efficient than mining and processing ore to eventually create it, we need to look at the possibilities here.

        • Joe
          January 24, 2014 @ 8:08 am

          Lo: Home Depot (and most likely other retailers) supplies plastic bags to put each individual battery in. You definitely should NOT dump a bag full of loose batteries in their recycle bin!

          Reply

      • I JEANNETTE VASQUEZ
        January 27, 2014 @ 7:19 pm

        Please don’t throw ur batteries in the garbage, take them to a recycle center where they will b disposed of properly…. THANK YOU

        Reply

      • Ray
        January 28, 2014 @ 9:51 am

        With regular AA, AAA, C, or D-style batteries, where the terminals are on opposite sides, there is no way that they can short if they are stored in an electrically-insulated container (i.e. not a metal tin) with batteries of the same style and nothing else. That said, as Brian mentioned, they should never be stored with keys or other electrically-conductive objects. I once had a couple of AA batteries in my pocket with my keys. Pretty soon, I felt a hot spot on my leg…. Needless to say, I removed the keys. 🙂

        Reply

      • Richard
        February 11, 2014 @ 2:03 pm

        NO< NO<NO recycle them.

        Reply

    • Cathie Helgeland
      January 23, 2014 @ 10:09 am

      This event happened to us about three weeks ago .. Used batteries that we had stored in the garage waiting to take to the recycle heated up and started a fire! Luckily we were home and the smoke detector in the garage sounded. Having a fire extinguisher right inside the door also helped in getting the fire under control. This event has changed how we store batteries from now on. I’ve shared this video on my Facebook with the hopes that others will watch and learn from it. Thank you-

      Reply

    • Mary Marshall-Ortiz
      January 23, 2014 @ 9:35 pm

      Thank you so much for that information.

      Reply

    • Monique Boets
      January 24, 2014 @ 2:34 pm

      What you don’t know, because nobody told you, you can’t be guilty of!
      You feel guilty because you feel responsible for other people
      You don’t have to but you do!
      That is so great!
      Thanks for sharing this very important message and giving us a solution to avoid this catastrophy!

      Reply

    • Karen E
      January 24, 2014 @ 5:08 pm

      What about the plastic storage boxes that has a “slot” for each battery (i.e. the batteries are not touching each other.)

      Reply

    • Peter
      January 26, 2014 @ 12:55 pm

      Yes indeed! Thank you!!

      Reply

    • Sue
      January 27, 2014 @ 10:53 pm

      I used to work for a large box store that would take in customer’s recycling; we had to stop taking batteries for just such reason. In order to send the batteries to the waste management company, they ALL had to be taped and it was too much for the company to do.
      I hope more people can see this video and take the information to heart. This is just a small step to take but it could mean everything in the end.

      Reply

  2. Rich Bloom
    January 16, 2014 @ 8:42 pm

    I never thought about this danger.

    Reply

    • Sarah
      January 22, 2014 @ 8:05 pm

      Karen, you can recycle used batteries at most Walmart locations. They typically have a tall plastic battery cylinder by the entrance.

      Reply

      • Heather
        January 23, 2014 @ 11:54 am

        Wow! So is that recycling bin a fire hazard?

        Reply

    • David
      January 23, 2014 @ 6:06 am

      You do not need to ‘recycle’ conventional batteries anymore. This excerpt from NYC Recycles explains why:
      In the 1990s, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency identified batteries as the largest source of mercury in municipal solid waste streams. If not properly handled, mercury exposure can be hazardous to human health and the environment. As the result of legislation and public pressure, the battery industry has removed mercury from virtually all household batteries.

      So… Just regular trash disposal.

      Reply

    • Nicole
      January 23, 2014 @ 7:52 am

      Most municipalities have a place where you can recycle batteries as well. There’s one by a library, nearby. If you call your city, you should be able to find a place easily.

      Reply

    • jamie fickas
      January 23, 2014 @ 11:41 am

      your local home depot should recycle batteries for you fyi

      Reply

      • Claire from NY
        January 24, 2014 @ 12:47 pm

        Yah, same here. They only take the rechargeable one 🙁

        Reply

    • Margie Ring
      January 23, 2014 @ 2:12 pm

      We brought a bag of AA, AAA, & C & D’s to Home Depot because we saw the recycling bend there & we were told it was only re-chargeable ones that could be re-cycled. So we brought our bag full of batteries back home. Margie

      Reply

      • Louise
        January 23, 2014 @ 4:17 pm

        I was told the same thing when trying to recycle used/dead batteries at Staples. Only re-chargeable ones. Where do you suggest we put them if NOT in the trash (which they are) if places won’t accept them?

        Reply

        • Will Helkenn
          January 23, 2014 @ 11:46 pm

          I don’t know what company services your area, but my garbage and recycling needs are met by one called Waste Connections. They provide included disposal of non-rechargeable with my regular garbage service. It works much like glass or motor oil, which go in their own containers. Put that box of “dead” batteries out on the street so your house is protected, and the waste management utility will likely provide proper disposal. The same goes for fluorescent bulbs. From my experience, FWIW, if you don’t sort them, neither will they.

          Reply

        • Dee
          January 24, 2014 @ 12:06 am

          Call your local garbage disposal company. They’ll tell you where their facility for battery disposal waste is, and you can simply drop them off there.
          Ours is only several blocks from home, but we live in a smallish city.

          Reply

        • Julie McCarty
          January 24, 2014 @ 9:17 am

          Look on the web for recycling centers in your area. If you have a recycling center that takes paper, plastic, etc. they probably have one that takes batteries. Also, Staples, Office Depot, Radio Shack, places like that will take non-rechargeables. Some times you just have to look. But please don’t throw them in the thras, they leech chemicals.

          Reply

        • KC
          January 24, 2014 @ 10:26 am

          I guess it depends on where you live but our Home Depot in northern VA definitely takes the non-rechargables, and the florescent light bulbs too.

          Reply

        • Aaron
          January 25, 2014 @ 4:17 am

          Take your batteries (rechargeable or not) to Rona. They will recycle them for you. And no… As long as they are packed in the supplied bags as directed, there is no fire hazard.

          Reply

        • Kristy
          January 25, 2014 @ 5:18 am

          I put the old batteries in a ziplock bag filled with water since the stores will not recycle them and then throw them away.

          Reply

  3. Sheri
    January 17, 2014 @ 11:31 am

    THANK YOU FOR THIS MESSAGE I did not even know this information about batteries. MAY GOD BLESS YOU AND YOUR FAMILY

    Reply

    • William
      January 23, 2014 @ 9:00 pm

      Try your local fire department and explain that it is critical you get them out of your house for the obvious reasons stated above.

      It’s really high time we get serious about this and make battery recycling a way of life and not the big mystery it unfortunately still is.

      Reply

      • Carole Dellorfano
        December 15, 2016 @ 11:33 am

        I wrapped 8 AAA batteries in foil to send to my sister with Xmas presents. I got it all wrapped, taped shut and picked it up…box was hotter than hell! If I hadn’t picked up that box…Scarey to think what could have happened!

        Reply

    • Boomer
      January 23, 2014 @ 10:47 pm

      My local recycling picks up regular batteries for recycling. You might check your local home recycling to see if they do it.

      Reply

    • Susan Daniels
      January 23, 2014 @ 11:58 pm

      Check with your local towns for a recycling center, ours is at our public works department, they have a place where we can take ALL of our batteries. Its out side and easy to get to. They take most everything from computer parts to T.V.’s…If your community doesn’t have a recycling center then you need to complain until you get one.

      Reply

    • Charles Andelin
      January 24, 2014 @ 2:28 pm

      You can recycle old Batteries, chemicals, old paint, and electronic components at Delta Diablo Sanitation on the Pittsburg Antioch highway.

      Reply

  4. Debra L. Walker
    January 17, 2014 @ 11:44 am

    Thanks for your share and your dedication to help others.

    Reply

  5. Linda
    January 17, 2014 @ 3:26 pm

    What a story ! I am sorry for your loss.
    It brings to mind a question I have about my storage of batteries. I have a plastic container with new opened batteries in them . I keep it in the living room, and we use them for replenishing batteries in convertors and toys etc. when they die out. Is this a fire hazard too then?
    Thanks,
    Linda

    Reply

    • debbie
      January 19, 2014 @ 12:58 pm

      from what he said,, only if the ends of batteries are touching, and all batteries, not just the 9 volt,, its just the 9 volt are the worst,,

      Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 22, 2014 @ 7:28 am

      If you are storing them in a plastic container, make sure they are all stacked cleanly on top of each other all positive ends on one end and all negative ends on the other. and that the length of the container is such that the batteries stay stable.

      Reply

  6. Barbara
    January 17, 2014 @ 5:37 pm

    Is this also true of unused batteries? I keep mine in a drawer and some of them are loose. OR is it only used batteries?

    Reply

    • Scott
      January 18, 2014 @ 11:11 am

      Barbara, This would be applicable for any 9 V battery, new or used. Completely discharge batteries would not be a threat but why take the chance. Tape all of your 9V batteries that are not secured in some other way.

      Reply

    • Ellie
      January 22, 2014 @ 7:01 pm

      Just a suggestion….Everyone should keep batteries in the Fridge to maintain full strength & longevity. If you have no space in a Fridge, they should be stored in a cool dry place. Not in garage or place where temperature is warm. Anytime, you plan to store an item with batteries, take them out first to prevent corroding! All batteries have dates on them, any used older batteries with dates of 2011 or before should just be discarded.

      Reply

      • Mark
        January 25, 2014 @ 9:07 am

        Actually storing in the fridge may only extend the shelf life by 3%. They are also subject to contact with moisture in which the elctrical circuit can be destroyed.
        I recently found some D batteries with a discard date of “2000”, now working in my Maglite.

        Reply

  7. Susan Butt
    January 17, 2014 @ 6:02 pm

    Hi, Sorry for your loss, but thank you for the valuable info. I would be interested in more videos, as long as we aren’t flooded with them.
    Thank you and God Bless!

    Reply

  8. gini
    January 17, 2014 @ 7:50 pm

    had no idea on the battery thing.. my parents house burned down when I was in elementary school and its something I worry about

    Reply

  9. liz and joe
    January 17, 2014 @ 8:48 pm

    Thanks for the first video … please send update notices

    Reply

  10. Kelly Nagy
    January 17, 2014 @ 9:00 pm

    Thank you so much for that information! Thank god you were all safe! I will discharged my batteries properly know!

    Reply

  11. Andrew
    January 17, 2014 @ 10:23 pm

    Maybe you should post the danger in the write up of the video. Thanks for posting.

    Reply

  12. Mary
    January 18, 2014 @ 1:46 am

    thank you for the ifo. God Bless

    Reply

  13. Russ W
    January 18, 2014 @ 5:41 am

    there is only 1 way 2 batteries can short to get hot, (dead short) batt 1 pos hit the neg of batt 2 and batt 1 neg hit the pos of batt 2, and it dose not matter if there new batteries or old ones, except new ones have a full charge and when you run 2 batteries in series at full charge you can have up to 18 – 20 volts dc, running 2 in series is fine if you got something that can take it, but a dead short of 2 batteries in series of about 16 volts dc like in what I described at the start makes more voltage than the 9 volt batteries was made for and both batteries are fighting each other getting hot until 1 or both go bang, and the different’s between new ones shorting and old ones shorting is time, new ones will have more volts and amperes than a used one making it less time to go bang, also if you all ways tape at lest one of the terminals, like the pos then shorts and or dead shorts cant happen

    Reply

    • David Galt
      January 18, 2014 @ 4:03 pm

      Not true Russ. With a nine volt battery or any battery it only takes one battery not necessarily two of them as you stated. In the electrical world it’s called resistance. Resistance causes heat. It is resistance that we heat our homes, out hot water heaters and so on. In the case here it could have easily been, and more probable, the metal casing of another battery that caused the (dead short). Put just one nine volt battery in your pocket with some loose change and you most likely will feel heat in your pocket. I remember once investigating a trash can fire and only found ashes and a nine volt battery. After questioning students, I found that candy wrappers that contained foil had been discarded in there as well.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtRkdttaYqs

      Reply

      • Dustin P
        January 19, 2014 @ 12:49 am

        Ding Ding Ding! We have a winner!

        Reply

        • Johnny Smith
          January 19, 2014 @ 5:30 pm

          David, you are very right. I have used a 9 volt battery and steel wool(something I keep in an emergency kit) to start a fire while camping in damp conditions and it doesn’t matter if it’s wet either. Folks have stored batteries in a utility drawer in a kitchen along with some small tools which have started many fires-only to be called an unknown kitchen related fire. I cut the plastic connectors off old broken toys and use the plugs to cover my batteries and stored securely in small plastic containers.

          Reply

      • Nichols
        January 20, 2014 @ 7:10 am

        There are many ways for batteries to get hot, I was at the lake with my family and put extra batteries in my pocket for the camera, next thing I know Im dropping my pants in front of everyone bc the batteries reacted with my pocket change and got hot enough to burn my leg.

        Reply

        • Sandy
          January 24, 2014 @ 4:56 pm

          I had the same experience, difference being I was alone when it happened, so no embarrassing moments!

          Reply

      • Chris H
        January 20, 2014 @ 4:54 pm

        Thanks for the demo, David. A simple and effective survival tip.

        Reply

      • Mari Lynn
        January 21, 2014 @ 5:13 pm

        At a fire prevention seminar a couple years ago the instructor relayed a story about a couple whose home entirely burned due to a fire started in their kitchen trash can. Apparently the husband had discarded an old dead battery (maybe not entirely dead) into the trash. Later that evening after cooking dinner, the wife threw into the trash the ‘foil’ she had used in preparing the dish. The battery came into contact with the foil, heating up whatever else was in the garbage and triggered the fire!… This was lesson enough for me, but now I will be even more cautious concerning 9-volts, and will be sure to tape them before discarding or recycling. Thank you!

        Reply

  14. wanda hodgson
    January 18, 2014 @ 6:21 am

    Sorry your family had to experience such a tragic loss. But now you have turned that in to an teaching tool for ever one else. Thank you… I’m not going to check all my drawers to see what i have stashed away.

    Reply

  15. Terri Lynn
    January 18, 2014 @ 6:54 am

    I have a bag of old batteries and light bulbs in my utility room. I had no idea! Thank you, so much, for sharing this video. Yes, I am interested in seeing more!

    Reply

  16. Pamela Giroux
    January 18, 2014 @ 7:32 am

    Very informative…who would have thought…I will be passing this on to everyone…thank-you!

    Reply

  17. Richard merritt
    January 18, 2014 @ 7:38 am

    Thank you

    Reply

  18. jimmy
    January 18, 2014 @ 7:50 am

    Hadnot even thought about that happeing with a battery.thanks for your video

    Reply

  19. myonlygarden
    January 18, 2014 @ 7:53 am

    Thank you so much for the information. God Bless you and your family.

    Reply

  20. Roger Peckham
    January 18, 2014 @ 8:29 am

    wow thanks for the tip .

    Reply

  21. tom
    January 18, 2014 @ 9:00 am

    Hi I was a firefighter paramedic from 90 to 2000 fought my share of fires etc.. Even to this day I would of never thought of the 9 volt doing this, yes I knew it could happen but never thought on how it happened! I know weird should of known too.. Love what you are doing, if any of my experience could help contact me.

    Tom

    ps tried your website and it kept asking for password and then 404 error showed up…

    Reply

  22. Jerome Duplantis
    January 18, 2014 @ 9:02 am

    I learned this trick while active duty in the Air Force. This is especially critical for higher powered lithium batteries. I usually run several wraps of electrical tape around the terminal ends on all batteries I dispose. However, I usually don’t for alkaline. After seeing this, that will become habit.

    Thanks

    Reply

  23. Donna
    January 18, 2014 @ 9:13 am

    I would love to get any videos with more information. I never even thought about batteries like this. I am glad no one was hurt. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply

  24. Kathryn Mora
    January 18, 2014 @ 9:14 am

    Thank you for sharing this information. I did not know that batteries can start fires.

    Reply

  25. Brenda Campbellm
    January 18, 2014 @ 9:43 am

    Very helpful. I will definitely tape all batteries before disposing of them from now on.

    Reply

  26. Suzanne Buckles
    January 18, 2014 @ 10:24 am

    Wow. Thank you for sharing this. I didn’t know that the batteries could be capable of starting a fire. I’m glad you and your family is safe.

    Reply

  27. LeAnne Sowa
    January 18, 2014 @ 10:46 am

    Thank you for this information. Did not know this about nine volt batteries. I will check what I have lying around.

    Reply

  28. Dave Mitchell
    January 18, 2014 @ 10:50 am

    Would you happen to have something about this in written form? My Wife does a monthly training for her office and would like to have a handout to go along with the video.
    Thanks

    Dave

    Reply

  29. Annie LePrieur
    January 18, 2014 @ 10:55 am

    SO SORRY FOR YOUR LOSS THANK YOU FOR SHARING THIS INFORMATION
    Annie IN Ontario Canada

    Reply

  30. Natalie Rohde
    January 18, 2014 @ 11:20 am

    After watching the video I check our box where we throw all our batteries and 2 9v had exploded in the box. I have learned an important lesson that could have been so bad. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply

  31. Carrie Coyne
    January 18, 2014 @ 11:34 am

    I went straight to the place we store our batteries (in our coffee table that opens) and realized we also have fingernail polish remover and polish in there. Thank you for this information. Making tragedy into helping others is amazing.

    Reply

    • Chris H
      January 20, 2014 @ 4:59 pm

      Wow. You definitely have angels watching over you!

      Reply

  32. Cara R.
    January 18, 2014 @ 11:41 am

    Thank you for sharing your story! I will be sharing this on my blog!

    Reply

  33. joann
    January 18, 2014 @ 12:22 pm

    Thanks for taking the time to share your story, I’m sure you have already saved someones life, and many more. This is so informative. Doing a full check on my ol batteries right now!

    Reply

  34. Belle
    January 18, 2014 @ 12:47 pm

    I purchased my first home and had no clue about this. Please share!!! This information must be told to everyone.

    Reply

  35. Sharon Bach
    January 18, 2014 @ 1:02 pm

    Would love to share this video and information for our safety meeting at work, I work at Dupont and I know this is something that would be of great insight to a lot of people. Thanks

    Reply

  36. Richard
    January 18, 2014 @ 1:27 pm

    Please sign me up.

    Reply

  37. April
    January 18, 2014 @ 1:33 pm

    So sorry about your home! So thankful your are sharing your story. Prayers for your family! I do have a couple questions; is this true if all batteries?? And can storing these in a fridge or freezer also keep this from happening??

    Reply

  38. Sandy Nicholson
    January 18, 2014 @ 1:34 pm

    Thank you for this important information.
    I would love to receive your updates and videos.

    Reply

  39. kathy gore
    January 18, 2014 @ 1:40 pm

    Is this not available in Cansda?

    Reply

  40. Teresa Fiato
    January 18, 2014 @ 1:50 pm

    Thanks for that wonderful advise. I never realized that batteries could have such a devastating effect. Thanks again. Teresa

    Reply

  41. krys
    January 18, 2014 @ 1:59 pm

    Very interesting!! Would like more information when available thank you.

    Reply

  42. Bethany
    January 18, 2014 @ 2:03 pm

    Sign me up please. This is good to know!

    Reply

  43. Mary
    January 18, 2014 @ 2:07 pm

    Who would have thought this would happen thank you for sharing!

    Reply

  44. Terry McNutt
    January 18, 2014 @ 2:09 pm

    I am interested

    Reply

  45. Karen
    January 18, 2014 @ 2:40 pm

    Thanks you!

    Reply

  46. Charolette Peddle
    January 18, 2014 @ 2:45 pm

    I am a fire fighter and I think what u are doing is amazing keep spreading the word, fire safety is very important 🙂 God bless you!!

    Reply

  47. Jean Snowden
    January 18, 2014 @ 2:52 pm

    Very valuable info.

    Reply

  48. Priscilla
    January 18, 2014 @ 2:55 pm

    PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF THIS HAPPENS WITH REGULAR BATTERIES ALSO, SHOULD ALL BATTERY’S BE TAPED ON ONE SIDE WHEN STORED?? ALSO IS IT ONLY FOR USED BATTERIES? I WOULD THINK NOT BECAUSE THEY ARE LESS POTENT

    Reply

    • David Galt
      January 18, 2014 @ 4:15 pm

      It can with regular batteries but is more so not likely because the neg and pos terminals are opposite each other. So unless you wrap it in foil chances are slim to none…not saying it can’t just less likely by design. Good practice to tape up all batteries just to be safe.

      Reply

  49. Judy Stephenson
    January 18, 2014 @ 3:15 pm

    Thanks so much for sharing this very important info……I will be passing it on to others. I’m sure what you have done will save MANY lives.
    I am so sorry for what you and your family have gone through.
    God Bless !!!

    Reply

  50. Kathleen Andres
    January 18, 2014 @ 3:18 pm

    This is very good information and I will pass it along. Something people just don’t think about.
    Thank you
    Kathleen

    Reply

  51. Gloria Kozlosky
    January 18, 2014 @ 3:24 pm

    Thank you. I will share this.

    Reply

  52. Deb Riddell
    January 18, 2014 @ 3:25 pm

    Sorry for your loss
    I have a question I store my batteries in the fridge they are AA And AAA loose or in the cardboard container should I put tape on the terminal also?

    Reply

    • Allana
      January 20, 2014 @ 11:23 am

      it would probably be a good idea, its better to be safe than sorry, remember Murphy’s law!

      Reply

  53. Teresa
    January 18, 2014 @ 3:25 pm

    Thank you for sharing this video. I will also pass it on. May you have more blessings to come.

    Reply

  54. Judy Waters
    January 18, 2014 @ 3:30 pm

    Thanks for the info.

    Reply

  55. Kim Gaston
    January 18, 2014 @ 4:08 pm

    Wow! We had no idea! Made all of our 4 children watch this, and will now have electrical tape where we keep our recycled batteries! I feel horrible for your family’s loss of memories and tangible items, but getting the word out there really is potentially saving lives! Thank you!

    Reply

  56. Brenda Banet
    January 18, 2014 @ 5:02 pm

    Thank you, I appreciate your information and am passing it on.

    Reply

  57. Peggy Brehm
    January 18, 2014 @ 5:26 pm

    In our town we have to tape ALL batteries before taking them to the recycling place so I have known about this for a few years. We were told most any tape will do so I use masking tape & they accept that.

    Reply

  58. donald perry
    January 18, 2014 @ 5:44 pm

    Thank you, very helpful, you did turn it into something positive!

    Reply

  59. donald perry
    January 18, 2014 @ 5:46 pm

    Thank you, very helpful, you did turn it into something positive!

    Take a look at my website Postmillennialism.net if you get a chance and go down to Dr. Advice. I have a lot of warnings like you do, but about healthy living. I make no money off it, it is for you.

    Reply

  60. april
    January 18, 2014 @ 5:52 pm

    Thank you for sharing the video about the fire. So sorry for your loss…God bless you for trying to bring awareness to this problem.

    Reply

  61. Donna
    January 18, 2014 @ 6:01 pm

    So sorry for your loss. Glad to hear that your family and pets are all safe. Looking forward to your other videos!

    Reply

  62. carla brown
    January 18, 2014 @ 6:40 pm

    I am a firefighter and found your information very interesting…i’m fire prevention officer and things like this are very helpful during fire prevention week.. Thank you for sharing. Greatful your family and fur family were all safe.

    Reply

  63. cara
    January 18, 2014 @ 7:06 pm

    Thank you for this information, we would have never known this. So glad your all alright!

    Reply

  64. Catherine Parks
    January 18, 2014 @ 7:17 pm

    Please send me all the info. Thank-you for thinking about the safety of others in your sad time of loosing your home. I always believe that as long as no one was hurt -everything else is replaceable. It’s heartbreaking to loose family photos and other precious items- but as long as you still have your loved ones- all else can be replaced in time.

    Reply

  65. Lorena MacDougall
    January 18, 2014 @ 7:29 pm

    I keep batteries in my drawer all the time ,scary…!!

    Reply

  66. Reatha
    January 18, 2014 @ 8:01 pm

    Thank you for sharing.. I’d never heard of this before – very valuable info.

    Reply

  67. J. Pemberton
    January 18, 2014 @ 8:05 pm

    Thank you very much! We are now aware and can make this change. I am always concerned to making our home place one of safety and am very, very grateful that you’ve spoken to this issue.
    Juliette Pemberton

    Reply

  68. Syrita Barbera
    January 18, 2014 @ 8:19 pm

    Thank you for sharing. I went immediately to where we keep our batteries. Took all the used ones outside and will tape and dispose of properly. Never knew this could happen. Sorry thus happened to your hour but glad you and yours are safe.

    Reply

  69. Colleen Sword
    January 18, 2014 @ 8:33 pm

    Thank yo for posting this important information. I am ashamed to say I just have the batteries in a box, together…I will be changing this habit! Thank you!!

    Reply

  70. Ree Kamenitz
    January 18, 2014 @ 9:15 pm

    Thanks for this heads up. I never thought of this, but I will now!!

    Reply

  71. Ross
    January 18, 2014 @ 9:19 pm

    Thanks for sharing. We have a drawer full of extra batteries. I would have never thought about this!

    Reply

  72. Charlene Kurland
    January 18, 2014 @ 9:20 pm

    Thank you for this very important information.

    Reply

  73. Christy Vachon
    January 18, 2014 @ 9:37 pm

    I was riding in the car. Had a heavy coat on. All of a sudden my pocket felt hot. When I stuck my hand in my pocket I burned my hand. I ripped my coat off to find I had rechargable AA batteries in my pocket with pennies which made a connection. I threw them out the window for fear they’d explode.

    Reply

  74. Lorraine
    January 18, 2014 @ 9:38 pm

    thank you….I am sharing it

    Reply

  75. Billy Amato
    January 18, 2014 @ 10:07 pm

    I am so sorry to see this and sorry for you and your wife. I “like” you on my Face Book. God be with you.

    Reply

  76. guy
    January 18, 2014 @ 10:45 pm

    Batteries can start a fire by making a spark! WHAAAAA?!?!?!? Everything I ever knew is turned upside down… Come on people this is a freak accident. This reminds me of the time my Mom saw that some kid on the news choked to death on his hoodie draw string. Next thing I know all my hoodie draw strings are removed and in the trash lol. Stuff happens, just try to keep sparky stuff away from stuff that likes to burn. This video makes it seem like this is a common thing to happen, but I can assure you it is quite rare.

    Reply

    • Sparky
      January 19, 2014 @ 6:59 am

      It probably wasn’t caused by a spark at all and no one claimed it happens commonly. Did you bother to watch it or did the title just inspire your natural rebellion? It could happen very easily. If it prevents one fire and possibly saves a life or two you don’t think it’s worth doing? Your mom probably understood that leaving the drawstrings in your hoodies might be dangerous to you if you were left unattended with them. You really should listen to her.

      Reply

    • debby
      January 19, 2014 @ 8:10 am

      This also happened at the hospital where I work. We were recycling 9 v batteries there in a plastic bin. And they caught on fire. Luckily it was extinguished quickly!

      Reply

  77. Jessica
    January 18, 2014 @ 10:46 pm

    This happened to my house 2 weeks ago.. thankfully it got caught by my mother before the flames took my whole kitchen

    Reply

  78. Therese
    January 18, 2014 @ 10:51 pm

    Thank you, would love to hear more and I will be separating my batteries in the morning. Unable to sign up as my postal code isn’t accepted. Take care

    Reply

  79. Fred Murphy
    January 18, 2014 @ 10:57 pm

    Very interest comment. I learnt something new today. THANKS

    Reply

  80. Kristine Jassman
    January 18, 2014 @ 11:03 pm

    I’m glad no one was hurt. I had no idea and had a big bag of assorted batteries and nails in my junk drawer. They’ve now been removed. Thank you, I didn’t realize the danger I was putting us in. I would be interested in receiving your videos and info.

    Reply

  81. Howard R Krauss MD
    January 18, 2014 @ 11:05 pm

    Dave, this message is just for you: You have a small pupil and a narrowed palpebral fissure on the left side (as well as mild left facial weakness); if these finding have not already been evaluated medically, you should consult a neuro-ophthalmologist.

    Howard

    Reply

  82. JoAnne Rando-Moon
    January 18, 2014 @ 11:50 pm

    THANK YOU FOR THIS LIFE SAVING INFO. I had no idea and just throw all my batteries in a drawer lose.

    Reply

  83. JIM DENAULT
    January 19, 2014 @ 3:42 am

    FOR THE PERSON WHO SAID IT IS NOT SO IMPORTANT, FEEL SORRY FOR U FAMILY, I ALSO PUT 9 VOLT IN MY POCKET BURNT MY SKIN CHANGE IN POCKET, SO WE SHOULD ALL FOLLOW THIS INFO. TU SO MUCH…//

    Reply

  84. Noubles Bouvanrt
    January 19, 2014 @ 4:44 am

    People still use 9 volts?

    Reply

  85. Dana Limperis
    January 19, 2014 @ 5:25 am

    Thank God your family is safe. Thank you for this wonderful message. I’ll be taking care of the loose batteries in my home today.
    Please add me to your email distribution list for your safety videos/messages.
    God Bless.

    Reply

  86. hester prynne
    January 19, 2014 @ 5:27 am

    Interesting

    Reply

  87. Diane Tomes-Low
    January 19, 2014 @ 5:48 am

    Thank you for sharing such valuable information.

    Reply

  88. Cindy Crawford
    January 19, 2014 @ 5:57 am

    We lost out house to a fire two years ago and know what horror you went thru. Unfortunately, we did lose out pet dog Stitch in the fire. The fire marshall determined that the fire was from a short in the middle of the wall. Why? We have no idea but its a very sad situation. Our house has been rebuilt but memories of losing our dog in the fire and the horror of thekids screaming will never get out of our heads. Thanks for postin this information!! Also, after the fire we had a remote for the t.v. and the batteries in it were so fire hot we barely could get out. Im positive they would of started a fire if I would not of noticed!! I Do have a battery box which holds all my batteries and because of your message will throw them all away now. Im already freaked out over electrical things being plugged in so now I will watch my batteries also. Thanks for all the tips!!

    Reply

  89. Cindy Crawford
    January 19, 2014 @ 5:59 am

    PS We had 4 little ones in the house at the time and it was just a gorgeous Florida day out at the time! You just never know and its a horrible situation. I was curious if any of your bibles burned up in your fire. We had about 5 of them and their edges burned but not the bible. We still have them….

    Reply

  90. Camay Magginnis
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:04 am

    Thank you very much for sharing. Despite that I knew batteries could spark accross small distances, never would have thought of it being enough by itself to cause a housefire.

    Reply

  91. angela
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:07 am

    VERY HELPFUL THANKS!

    Reply

  92. jean bolduc
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:13 am

    never knew this, got to check my junk drawers!! sorry for your loss.

    Reply

  93. BARBARA ROUSH
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:38 am

    thanks for the information so glad very one is OK

    Reply

  94. Donna
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:48 am

    Thank you, What a lesson to learn

    Reply

  95. Kristine Pagano
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:57 am

    I’m so sorry you went through this terrible experience. God Bless you for turning it into a positive for others. We wish you all the best.

    Reply

  96. Becky
    January 19, 2014 @ 7:50 am

    Thank you so much fro this information. I too recycle batteries and they are sitting in a plastic container all jumbled up in my pantry. I am constantly throwing batteries in the container, so it is always getting bumped. I will change that today. Thank you again- you most likely saved my family from the same fate you had.

    Reply

  97. Nancy
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:04 am

    I always knew to make sure that battery terminals did not touch each other so when storing or disposing I ensure they are neatly organized that the terminals don’t connect in any way. I never thought how it works for 9 volts though. I will be paying particular attention to how all my batteries are stored AND disposed of. Thank you so much for doing this announcement, it is greatly appreciated. Nancy in Penticton, BC, Canada.

    Reply

  98. Kim Lockhart
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:12 am

    Thank You!

    Reply

  99. maria
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:35 am

    wow, many thanks, will pass this on

    Reply

  100. Katrina Trevors
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:39 am

    Thank you for sharing your story, I always store used batteries this way till I discard them.. Now I will keep electrical tape with my bag always! Thank you

    Reply

  101. Pamela Mertes
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:44 am

    Hi thank you for sharing.. Thank God you and your family are safe. I will be praying for you. My parents lost there home due to fire it is very difficult to go through.

    Reply

  102. Vallerie Malkin
    January 19, 2014 @ 9:21 am

    I would like to be on the list; this video is excellent and I’m going to share it with my 500 + facebook friends. Happy your family is okay.

    Reply

  103. Barbara Mackenzie
    January 19, 2014 @ 9:21 am

    Thank YOU for turning your loss & sense of responsibility into a gift of service to the world.
    Character Education is also my passion. http://www.tgi.virtuesproject.com

    Reply

  104. shirley ehl
    January 19, 2014 @ 9:47 am

    Thank you.

    Reply

  105. Erin
    January 19, 2014 @ 10:04 am

    I would like to sign up but it won’t let me because It won’t accept my canadian postal code :/

    Thanks for your information, Im’ going to go clean out our “junk drawer” because I know there are a bunch of random batteries in there.. it’s not your fault, and I’m so glad your family and pets are safe.

    Reply

  106. Bernie Scott
    January 19, 2014 @ 10:18 am

    Never,never,never put loose 9 volt batteries anywhere. They can cause a fire in your coat pocket if so much as a penny is in there with it. These batteries MUST be taped up in such a way as to completely cover up the electrical contacts. If not trouble will occur..A 9Volt battery has the potential of producing 9 amps of current….Ohms Law states that current is equal to voltage divided by resistance….so, 9 volts divided by 1 ohm of resistance will produce 9 amps of current.( a dead short means NO resistance)… Of course that will only be for a couple of seconds but that is enough to cause somebody to have a heart attack if their body resistance is low enough for some weird reason….It only takes one tenth of one amp to kill…..that is why when working on live equipment you always keep one hand in your pocket…..So beware of those deceiving little 9 volt batteries..

    Reply

    • David Spector
      July 12, 2014 @ 5:25 am

      Bernie Scott, It requires both sufficient current and voltage to electrocute a person. A 9 volt battery can only hurt a person by starting a fire. Touching 9 volts, even if you are wet, will do nothing! It doesn’t matter that the electrical resistance of a body is always low.

      “It only takes one tenth of one amp to kill,” true, but that 1/10 amp must be at a much higher voltage.

      Most electrocution happens from power lines, which carry 110 or 220 volts indoors, and 1000 to 100,000 volts outdoors. Please understand that this kind of voltage is VERY different from that produced by small batteries!

      It is good to warn people about hazards, but always make sure that the information you distribute is correct. If you are not certain, best to keep quiet until you have looked it up.

      Reply

  107. Rose Godfrey
    January 19, 2014 @ 10:21 am

    Thank you. Good to know. Never would have thought. Thank you.

    Reply

  108. Russell C Lewis
    January 19, 2014 @ 10:26 am

    Well, for this guy and for everyone who posted they have old batteries in a drawer, here is a bright idea… THROW THE BATTERIES OUT. Why on earth would you keep batteries that are no longer any good in the first place? It is not rocket science to throw out something which may cause you harm and no longer has a useful purpose.

    Reply

    • Alyssa
      January 21, 2014 @ 12:16 pm

      I believe you’re missing the point of the video. He had them in a bag in the garage, to be thrown out and did not tape the ends which is what resulted in the fire.

      Reply

  109. Jennifer Devoe
    January 19, 2014 @ 10:55 am

    First i feel i need to say that u need to take that blame of of yourself. I had absolutly no idea that they could even catch fire and i do have them all over the house and together even in drawers and so on . Thank u soo much for getting the word out. U truly are saving lives.

    Reply

  110. John
    January 19, 2014 @ 10:58 am

    What is a baddery ?

    Reply

  111. neal moore
    January 19, 2014 @ 11:19 am

    Thanks for your video. I got rid of my loose 9 volts. I would suggest your case might be more compelling if you had someone do a demo of two batteries “sparking.”

    Reply

    • Andrew Stanford
      January 21, 2014 @ 1:28 pm

      Neal, it’s not the “sparking” that caused this fire, it could, I would say, but it is really the heat that can build up from a dead short, plenty hot enough to catch plastic, paper, or other “fuel” on fire. Dead short two 9 volts together, like happened in this fire (according to the video anyway) and you have plenty of heat to start a fire. ONE 9 volt can start a fire also, like one in your pocket, coming into contact with a coin or key. Just letting you know, it’s not the spark… (at least not always, if ever)

      Reply

  112. Deanne Counter
    January 19, 2014 @ 11:22 am

    Very informative. I had no idea. Thank you.

    Reply

  113. James Leon Mahan
    January 19, 2014 @ 11:40 am

    I once had a 9V battery in my pocket, also the same pocket I had my keys, I burnt my leg but was able to remove the battery before it actually caused a fire, it got so hot and it hurt really bad before I noticed. I am going to be more careful on all types of batteries and tape the ends of all of them now that I know.

    Reply

  114. CONNIE
    January 19, 2014 @ 11:44 am

    THANK YOU FOR THIS INFORMATION. I TOO DO THIS AND DID NOT KNOW OR GAVE IT ANY THOUGHT ABOUT THE BATTERIES. SO THANK YOU FOR THIS INFO NOW MY HOUSE WILL BE SAFER

    Reply

  115. Tammy
    January 19, 2014 @ 11:44 am

    Thank you so much for sharing!! This information is very important and will save many lives…

    Reply

  116. Lisa Bloom
    January 19, 2014 @ 11:53 am

    Thank you for posting this video. I did not know this information. I am so glad you and your family are safe. God Bless. Yes, I would like to see more of your videos. Thank you.

    Reply

  117. Narda Powell
    January 19, 2014 @ 12:04 pm

    Thank you….passing this on.

    Reply

  118. Lori W
    January 19, 2014 @ 12:56 pm

    I had something happen one day..I was cleaning around the house had some things I put in my pocket to throw in the “junk” drawer…one being a Nicole ,the other a 9 volt battery….doing my work after awhile all of a sudden I was feeling a burning on my leg…causing me to scream… I emptied my pocket.which was the cause and discover the nickle was laying across the terminals causing it to heat up as you said…luckily I was not hurt …thanks for the tips.the video..and thank god you were all safe…..sorry for your loss of your home

    Reply

  119. Becky Daily
    January 19, 2014 @ 12:57 pm

    Thank you for the valuable information. So sorry this happened to you. Thank you for turning your loss into a lesson for the rest of us.

    Reply

  120. Shannon
    January 19, 2014 @ 12:57 pm

    I also had this happen to me, except it was in my work truck. I had a 6V 12 amp battery on the front seat of my truck to service a customer’s emergency lights with, then tossed my wire coiled workbook onto the seat of the truck. It only took about an hour of sitting on the seat of my truck, and the paper in the book was all charred. The truck had filled with smoke also. I was lucky that was all that had burned! From that moment on I tape connections just as this man indicated.

    Reply

  121. Lori W
    January 19, 2014 @ 12:58 pm

    Nickel….not Nicole…I hate auto correct.

    Reply

  122. marie graff
    January 19, 2014 @ 1:02 pm

    send me more videos

    Reply

  123. barbara
    January 19, 2014 @ 1:07 pm

    I understand your statement regarding turning a negative to a positive, wanting to help others, save them from your experience. I am a DV survivor and produced a film using the actual public record footage, recordings, crime scene photos etc. So viewers actually walk in my footsteps as it occurred. I’m told my film is saving lives and that is my healing– to know that through the darkness of my horror, my experience will impact others in a positive way, and save lives. Thank you for sharing your story. I am checking my stored batteries next!

    Reply

  124. Patricia
    January 19, 2014 @ 1:27 pm

    My Husband was a commercial fire underwriting supervisor with a major insurance company…we know lots of safety tips for preventing fires, but not this one…thanks every so much…electrical tape is now a permanent part of out tool kits…

    Reply

  125. debbie little
    January 19, 2014 @ 1:34 pm

    thank you for sharing this

    Reply

  126. A Walker
    January 19, 2014 @ 1:41 pm

    Thank you for sharing this! I would have never known about it otherwise. Hard lesson for you, but you may have saved lives.

    Reply

  127. Patricia
    January 19, 2014 @ 1:47 pm

    Being retired from a major insurance company, that is one fire prevention tip I never heard…thanks for sharing, and so sorry for the lose of your home. Happy all are safe…

    Reply

  128. Hypnotist JimmyG
    January 19, 2014 @ 1:54 pm

    glad you guys are safe. Great video. Ive had lots of these laying around the house. Just got rid of all of them.

    Reply

  129. Dave Elkow
    January 19, 2014 @ 1:55 pm

    I was once working on a garage bench when I struck something on the bench and a tool battery fell over on a shelf. The battery touched a pad of steel wool that happened to be laying there, and the steel wool burst into flames. Batteries can pack some punch!

    Reply

  130. melissa
    January 19, 2014 @ 1:57 pm

    thank you for sharing!! hubbys down stairs cleaning out the junk drawer as we speak. is it just 9 volt? AA, AAA, etc wont be a hazard if they touch?

    Reply

  131. Judy
    January 19, 2014 @ 2:01 pm

    Wow! I do the same thing. Tossing batteries into a box to recycle… Not any more. I will tape the ends first. Thank you for this life saving information!

    Reply

  132. Helena Lewis
    January 19, 2014 @ 2:04 pm

    Thank you so much for sharing this important info , so happy to hear that your family are OK, God Bless! once again many thanks!!!

    Reply

  133. Rik Hudson
    January 19, 2014 @ 2:05 pm

    Message received! Thank you. And thanks be to God for ensuring you and your family, animals included, are OK.

    Reply

  134. Lori
    January 19, 2014 @ 2:13 pm

    Thank you for posting this video and, I am sorry that your home was severely damaged this way. What batteries can do is extremely scary. I had no idea that they could start a fire.
    I have new batteries that I’ve taken out of the package and are loose withing a ziplock bag. I am going to put electrical tape over the tops of the batteries as I do not want the same thing happening to me.

    Reply

  135. Beckie
    January 19, 2014 @ 2:22 pm

    Please sign me up to receive these videos. I work for local government and one of my friends is Safety Manager. I would like to share. I’ve learned something new.

    Reply

  136. Kelly
    January 19, 2014 @ 2:22 pm

    I tried to sign up for your videos but I live in Bath, New Brunswick, Canada and it will not allow me to get past *City* on your form. Thank you for sharing this, it will certainly make people think about proper disposal of something so simple as a battery. I would love to see more of your videos.

    Reply

  137. Shawna MacDonald
    January 19, 2014 @ 2:35 pm

    Awesome job hopefully many will learn and take precautions

    Reply

  138. Teressa
    January 19, 2014 @ 2:43 pm

    Thanks for the knowledge/warning!

    Reply

  139. Arenda
    January 19, 2014 @ 3:10 pm

    Valuable information. Sorry for your lost.

    Reply

  140. Robin Kaplan
    January 19, 2014 @ 4:55 pm

    I would love to receive more informative video’s. Never knew that about 9 volt batteries- used to use them all the time and I would have them in a loss container-Never again-Thank God you and you family are all ok. Great Info!!

    Reply

  141. amanda
    January 19, 2014 @ 4:59 pm

    thankyou for putting this info out. i never thought about it before .batteries touching each other even recycling ones and them starting a fire. im going to go and do some taping and reorganizing my stored and my recycled batteries right now. thankyou!

    Reply

  142. Leah
    January 19, 2014 @ 5:05 pm

    I kept all my AA and AAA batteries in a metal dog bowl I had from when my dog was a puppy. There were 14 batteries in that metal bowl. After watching this video I immediately taped all the ends with electrical tape. Thank you for posting this video. I had no idea batteries could catch fire that way.

    Reply

  143. Abby
    January 19, 2014 @ 5:46 pm

    Please send me these when they are available.
    Thanks,
    Abby

    Reply

  144. bryan
    January 19, 2014 @ 5:53 pm

    like some videos tks

    Reply

  145. Louise
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:01 pm

    How about the companies….be responsible for this. And put a cap or some black electro tape in the packing with the battery. I keep all my batteries outside of the house anyway. But I will make sure that I put black electro tape on them also.

    Reply

    • Julia
      January 20, 2014 @ 8:40 am

      Actually, new 9-volt batteries DO come with a cap over them. Keep it and recap when you’re finished with the batteries.

      Reply

  146. karen madsen
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:14 pm

    I would love to have these videos as they become available .. you taught me and my family a valuable lesson here tonight thank you
    Im sorry for your family and what they went thru

    Reply

  147. Amy
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:18 pm

    This is why I never take batteries out of the original packaging until I’m ready to use them, then straight to the garbage when they can longer be used.

    Reply

  148. Catharine Rose
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:21 pm

    Thank you for sharing your story. I’m so glad you and all your family made it out of your home safely. I’m so sorry for your loss. I can only imagine how difficult it has been.

    Reply

  149. Wendy
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:30 pm

    Ty. Lesson learned. Sharing. Sorry for your loss.

    Reply

  150. Bob Moore
    January 19, 2014 @ 6:38 pm

    Please send video thanks

    Reply

  151. April Spence
    January 19, 2014 @ 7:07 pm

    Thank you for the information…And sharing your story with us, to try and prevent another accident from happening.

    Reply

  152. Kim Rigby
    January 19, 2014 @ 7:12 pm

    Thank you very very much!!

    Reply

  153. Susan Vaughn
    January 19, 2014 @ 7:36 pm

    Thank you for this video! I had no idea that batteries could be so dangerous. I had all my batteries in a drawer in my house and have taped them all. I am so sorry for the loss of your home and am thankful that you, your family, and your pets made it out alive and uninjured.

    Reply

  154. Diana Arnold
    January 19, 2014 @ 7:52 pm

    Please send me a copy of this video. I would like to use it as a health and safety tip a my office and spread the word to my friends.

    Thank you,
    Diana Arnold

    Reply

  155. Kelly M. Bosak
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:26 pm

    God bless you and your family

    Reply

  156. Patricia
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:30 pm

    Please send me more info… Thanks for sharing!!

    Reply

  157. Lee Morin
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:36 pm

    Good information!

    Reply

  158. reefseeker
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:50 pm

    I dump them in bucket of water. In short time they are harmless

    Reply

  159. Julie Crisp
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:58 pm

    Please send more updates I am very interested as being a mother of a Firefighter this is very much shocking to me I have learned a lot of things about fire safety but didn’t know this information..Thank you for sharing this video~ Julie~

    Reply

  160. Dawn Willett
    January 19, 2014 @ 8:59 pm

    Wow this is so helpful…but then I sorta panicked thinking I have batteries every where. Not 9volt but others. Is there any danger like this of them laying around in drawers…etc? I would really like to know, because I need to clean up this mess of batteries we have then. Thank you so much for the information and being a blessing to others out of your tragedy. Gob Bless you.

    Reply

  161. Karen
    January 19, 2014 @ 9:00 pm

    Just saw your video about the fire – sent through facebook. Thank you for making this information your mission. I have a container of new batteries and will now be taping the ends. Karen

    Reply

  162. Shay
    January 19, 2014 @ 9:17 pm

    I did not know this. Thank you for sharing this! I would like more information.

    Reply

  163. Jenny Price
    January 19, 2014 @ 9:35 pm

    thank you for sharing! I am so glad your family is safe and that your sharing with all of us this danger

    Reply

  164. Danielle
    January 19, 2014 @ 9:54 pm

    I buy all batteries from costco, so we all know the packages that they come in, and i’m out of town now for work, and super paranoid.. they should be fine in their proper boxes right? all batteries are side by side in each… pretty scary

    Reply

  165. Sheila Richards
    January 19, 2014 @ 11:17 pm

    I’m at a wedding out of state but as I saw your video I immediately called our home and asked my adult son to check the plastic baggie in the laundry room where we keep all our batteries. He said that most of the pkgs were opened and batteries were laying loose. If this is such a hazard why don’t more people know about this? Thank you for the information and I will pass it on.

    Reply

  166. Rose
    January 19, 2014 @ 11:36 pm

    Thank you for sharing this information. I have batteries in a container under my sink at this moment. I will be dealing with it in a minute.

    Reply

  167. susan
    January 19, 2014 @ 11:52 pm

    I wrapped batteries in foil for a trip, one day later they had acid leaking out of them. live and learn

    Reply

  168. Lisa Brown
    January 20, 2014 @ 12:10 am

    wow this is a new one thank you

    Reply

  169. Margaret King
    January 20, 2014 @ 1:46 am

    Thank you so much for this information!. Live in a forest; so one fire could easily turn into hundreds of homes being destroyed…………..and worse! Never knew this could ever happen; thanks again.

    Reply

  170. Pam Crawford
    January 20, 2014 @ 4:49 am

    Thank you for sharing this. I would have never know. I would like to share it on my website and to send to my clients. Could I have your permission.

    Reply

  171. tammy
    January 20, 2014 @ 5:16 am

    Thank you for the information very essential for the safy of one’s house …

    Reply

  172. Lisa Allard-Noreau
    January 20, 2014 @ 5:30 am

    Would love to learn more. I too have had a fire although it was an electrical fire it was life changing

    Reply

  173. Carrie
    January 20, 2014 @ 5:33 am

    Wow…that’s super crazy…I am paranoid about fire to begin with…now I will be checking every drawer and box I own looking for these things…thanks for sharing despite your tragedy..best of luck to you

    Reply

  174. Christine
    January 20, 2014 @ 6:02 am

    Thank you for sharing such important information

    Reply

  175. Jackie
    January 20, 2014 @ 6:54 am

    Our house fire started as a result of the rechargeable battery for a remote control plane exploding in our sons’ bedroom. The risks and dangers of batteries aren’t topics the battery industry talks about much!

    Reply

  176. Barbara
    January 20, 2014 @ 7:47 am

    Very informative video! Thank you

    Reply

  177. Marina
    January 20, 2014 @ 7:50 am

    Thank you so much for sharing. I had no idea and I too recycle my batteries the wrong way. Is it the same danger for the other batteries, AA, AAA, C, D? I am interested in getting more safety information from you.

    Reply

  178. Celeste Lawler
    January 20, 2014 @ 7:55 am

    I always keep batteries in my refrigerator. I think years ago I heard somewhere that they lasted longer if you did.

    Reply

  179. Tony Genova
    January 20, 2014 @ 8:16 am

    Great info
    Manufacturers should include a tape strip over the top.
    The responsABILITY is on them as well.

    Reply

  180. Patti Walker
    January 20, 2014 @ 8:28 am

    Thank you.

    Reply

  181. trish
    January 20, 2014 @ 8:30 am

    sign me up

    Reply

  182. Ermac
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:36 am

    Seriously? People need to be told this? If you bridge the contacts of any battery without something actually draining the energy, it will heat up. ALOT. You all need to read more.
    http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/questions/question/3467/

    Reply

  183. Roger Marchand
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:45 am

    Very useful information. I know how this could happen but never realized how easy it could happen.

    Reply

  184. Charlene
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:49 am

    Thank You for sharing and I am so glad everyone was okay.

    Reply

  185. Alberta
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:52 am

    Thanks for this lesson on batteries, never knew this, will be sure to take proper care of all batteries next time I throw any out..

    Reply

  186. Rose Howell
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:57 am

    Thank you so much for the information. This never even crossed my mind as when I get rid of batter they are what I believed to be dead..Thank you again so much

    Reply

  187. Esther
    January 20, 2014 @ 10:15 am

    I had no idea! My husband and I have gone through 2 house fires in the 20 years we’ve been married (both in the same house). The first one in 1997 was my own stupidity, I was deep frying french fries and left them unattended to check on the bbq outside. But the second fire we had in 2008 is still unknown what caused it. We thought it might have been mice chewing on wires, but who knows, it could have been batteries in the cupboard. I have a big plastic container full of old batteries in my cupboard right now and I’m going to go and find some electrical tape to cover the ends immediately!

    Reply

  188. Lucie
    January 20, 2014 @ 10:28 am

    Thank you so much for sharing. For me, I did not realize this. Because of your experience, now I do!

    Reply

  189. Lisa Westbrook
    January 20, 2014 @ 10:42 am

    Wow, thank you so much. I am so sorry this happened to you and your families home. I have batteries all over my house. I will now change that and follow your direction for proper recycling and disposal. Safety First!

    Reply

  190. Captain Obvious
    January 20, 2014 @ 10:44 am

    I didn’t know it was possible to NOT know that batteries are potentially dangerous. Seriously, they are stored electrical energy and contain caustic and toxic components. What is wrong with our schooling and critical thinking that so many people are clueless about this ?

    Reply

  191. Daniel
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:02 am

    How does this apply to other batteries besides the 9vs? like aaa, aa, ds etc.

    Reply

  192. Lisa MacDonald
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:05 am

    Thank you soo much for sharing. Glad everyone is ok.

    Reply

  193. Lisa Bonhotal
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:12 am

    Thank you and looking forward to your videos..Lisa

    Reply

  194. Christina Clancy
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:25 am

    I would like to see the other videos…our house burned when I was 13, and the fire department called it ‘spontaneous combustion’. I’m wondering now if it could have been caused by batteries. My parents never threw anything away – and this was back before recycling was a part of everyday life. We had drawers full of old batteries, loose change, wires from various appliances, etc.

    Reply

  195. Shelly
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:25 am

    As I sit here looking at a zip lock bag full of batteries for recycling…knowing I also have a drawer full of open new batteries also. Thank You for sharing your ordeal with others, I am sure you have prevented loss of property and lives by sharing your experience! God Bless!

    Reply

  196. Leisa
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:37 am

    im very interested in more videos. Im really sorry what happened to ur house. Im glad everyone made it out safe.

    Reply

  197. Carol Borys
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:38 am

    Thank you for sharing this information. I recycle my batteries and throw them together into a plastic container…will now be more careful.

    Reply

  198. Kathleen Shellady
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:38 am

    Thank you for sharing this life saving information. I had no idea and could have been in the same situation as you. Because of you, I know better!

    Reply

  199. Faye
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:43 am

    Thank you for sharing – didn’t know this could happen in that way. I will take your advice.

    Reply

  200. Ivan
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:48 am

    thank for the imfo wat a great idea

    Reply

  201. Susan Schneider
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:50 am

    Thanks a lot for sharing

    Reply

  202. R.Kemp
    January 20, 2014 @ 11:57 am

    I am very interested in more information on fire safety, thank GOD your family is safe. God Bless you all

    Reply

  203. D.Tip
    January 20, 2014 @ 12:00 pm

    Thank you so much. I am a group fitness(aerobics) instructor. In order for me to teach I have to wear a microphone, in order for the microphone to work I have to carry around 9 volt batteries in my gym bag. My gym bag goes everywhere with me. My car, my garage, my house; EVERYWHERE.

    Once a month I go to costco to buy a huge package of 9 volts. I rip open the package to dump them into the large end pocket of my gym bag. On several occasions I have reached in to grab a battery and almost been burned, this always happened on a hot summer day when my bag had been in my truck. I always assumed it had something to do with the car and the summer heat. How horrible would it be to have my bag, in my truck, in my garage and have the timing and placement be just right for those batteries. I am sure with all the junk my hubby stores in the garage that my house is HIGHLY flammable.
    From now on I will store them safely, I appreciate you sharing this story. I also appreciate the fact that you have impacted my life with this story. I will be sharing your video with the rest of the instructors from the gym that I teach at.

    Dusti

    Reply

  204. Jennifer
    January 20, 2014 @ 12:21 pm

    Thank you and so sorry you had to go through this

    Reply

  205. Dorothy
    January 20, 2014 @ 12:22 pm

    Oh my gosh! You have answered a puzzle for me. I have batteries in a drawer in my kitchen and one day when I opened that drawer (other things in there too) something smelled very hot. Upon inspection I found it was a battery that was very hot. I took it out and it immediately cooled off but I didn’t know what had happened. Thank you for this message.

    Reply

  206. Sharon Strack
    January 20, 2014 @ 12:23 pm

    Good information…..personally am petrified of house fires so will check my batteries

    Reply

  207. Nathan Fair
    January 20, 2014 @ 12:36 pm

    Thank you for posting this information!

    Reply

  208. adale o'brien
    January 20, 2014 @ 12:41 pm

    what about the new batts from walgreens that are completely wrapped in cellophane? one has to pull a little red strip to open the wrapping.
    from now on i will buy the batts that have a little plastic guard on the top.
    but let me know about the walgreens product . . .

    Reply

  209. Susan Zitofsky
    January 20, 2014 @ 12:44 pm

    Question: If I tape up the unused 9V loose batteries, will they still work when I untape them and put them to use? Thanks for clarification. I’m so sorry about your home!! Thank you for sharing this important info. I will share, as well.

    Reply

  210. monique hodge
    January 20, 2014 @ 1:10 pm

    Please sigvn me up for more posted videos that you have!
    thanks and God Bless You!

    Reply

  211. Brenda
    January 20, 2014 @ 1:16 pm

    Thank you for Sharing your info <3 I had no idea 🙁

    Reply

  212. Lrak
    January 20, 2014 @ 1:22 pm

    My lord, I am guilty of careless disposal of batteries too.

    Reply

  213. Rhona
    January 20, 2014 @ 1:25 pm

    Thanks so much for the amazing information. Very glad you and your family are okay.

    Reply

  214. Janis Joe
    January 20, 2014 @ 1:38 pm

    You did make this a positive! You have opened a whole lot of eye’s! Sorry it caused so much damage. And thank goodness you all got out alive! Thank-you for caring and sharing. After I watched your clip I went to my cutlery drawer and took out all my loose batteries in there. Thank -you!!!!.

    Reply

  215. Jack Lynch
    January 20, 2014 @ 1:51 pm

    Glad to have the information. I have tried licking the terminals in the past, and know how much of a jolt that a fresh 9V can pack. Your message, I’m sure, will spare others the grief! Thank you!

    Reply

  216. Melissa Aston
    January 20, 2014 @ 1:54 pm

    Hey Thanks for the info, interestingly, I just got rid of my bag of used batteries, depositing them into a box with other bags of assorted used batteries at a nearby battery store. Now this seems unsafe, and I want to notify the shop about that potential danger.

    Reply

  217. Barb
    January 20, 2014 @ 1:59 pm

    I am so sorry you had to face this and I am grateful that you took the time to make this video. I am a retired IICRC Master Restorer and helped so many families get through house fires in my career. Be sure to make a video about dryers too. It only takes a minute to prevent a tragic house fire.

    Reply

  218. Carrie
    January 20, 2014 @ 1:59 pm

    I had no idea batteries were dangerous like that. I have them stored all over my home, several in bags to be recycled! I had 12 batteries of various sizes stored in with other metal tools in my son’s camping gear for Boy Scouts. Scares me that it could of caught on fire -I had the gear stored in his bedroom! Thank you so much for getting the word out to others!!!

    Reply

  219. Gwen West
    January 20, 2014 @ 2:26 pm

    Well you are a life saver! I had no idea that something like this could happen. Thank you so very much for sharing your story and all this information. I’m so happy to hear that nobody was injured in your fire. Looking forward to getting more useful information when it’s available.
    Many thanks!

    Reply

  220. Chris
    January 20, 2014 @ 2:34 pm

    I had 2 AAA batteries in my pocket, one day at the gym, because I knew the batteries in my MP3 player were going to die while working out. That pocket started getting very warm, the batteries “shorted out” via my keys.

    TAPE ONE END OF ANY AA, AAA, C or D BATTERY AND BOTH POSTS ON A 9V, EVEN IF YOU STORE THEM IN A PLASTIC BIN.

    Reply

  221. Lisa White
    January 20, 2014 @ 2:41 pm

    Glad everyone is safe…thank you for sharing this info with us and hope this brings you some healing. I have taped all my batteries. They were in a big bucket. I would have been devastated to lose my pets in a fire if i wasn’t home to save them.

    Reply

  222. Phil
    January 20, 2014 @ 2:46 pm

    Hey there thank you for sharing this video!! We have a 3 year old, and he touches everything especially batteries if he manages to find any. With another child on the way, my first biological child I feel this incredible need to do more then we already have done to make our home safe. So if you ahve any more videos please share them with me. I will happily except emails from you for sure.

    Praise god you are all ok!! I also know how you feel about your fire because with my unborn baby girl right now. Mom is suffering from difficulties through the pregnancy and I can’t help but feel as tho I knew better then to have a baby at all because in the past (with someone else) I lost my child due to miscarriage. Now they never said it had anything to do with me but still. I can’t help but feel as tho its my fault in some manner that both mom and and my little innocent princess have to suffer. So I get you totally!!

    God speed and I hope to see some emails from you with more helpful information and updates on how you and your family are doing.

    God Bless
    Phil

    Reply

    • Sam
      March 23, 2014 @ 6:41 pm

      So this has nothing to do with batteries, but Phil why was it more important to childproof your home with a biological child. It shouldn’t make one difference. Infact it’s disturbing you felt the need to say this and even more disturbing your first (biological or not) child does not have the same importance!!! I’m disgusted. Sorry but every child is important! I would hate to see your parenting when your “biological” child comes!!! Sigh…poor kids!

      Reply

  223. Juliana Rut
    January 20, 2014 @ 2:47 pm

    Hi
    You’ve managed to reach Iceland with this video.
    I’ll pass it around to my friends.
    Thank you for pointing this out, this thought has crossed my mind once or twice when disposing of batteries but I thought it couldn’t possibly happen. Now I know better.

    Reply

  224. Debbie
    January 20, 2014 @ 2:52 pm

    Thank you

    Reply

  225. Judy Eggleston
    January 20, 2014 @ 3:02 pm

    I had to idea! And we have those loose in a drawer!! New ones waiting to be used. I am so thankful you shared this. I am also glad your family was ok. You can replace “things”, not family.

    Please send more videos, I would love to get them.

    Reply

  226. Julia
    January 20, 2014 @ 3:26 pm

    Would like to sign up to receive your videos. So wonderful you have turned such a horrible experience into something positive. Thank you.

    Reply

  227. Bobbi Webley
    January 20, 2014 @ 3:44 pm

    I would like more information on the videos your doing.
    Thank you for this important information. God bless you.

    Reply

  228. Joyce Lee
    January 20, 2014 @ 4:05 pm

    We have been doing the same thing grouping batteries together without a thought to the danger. Thank you!!

    Reply

  229. Nancy Wheeler
    January 20, 2014 @ 4:15 pm

    Thank God you are all ok. Thank you for sharing with us all.

    Reply

  230. regina sherlock
    January 20, 2014 @ 4:33 pm

    thanks for info

    Reply

  231. Dana D. Campbell
    January 20, 2014 @ 4:36 pm

    Thank you so very much for this life saving information. I had no idea and could have be in the same situation as you, but because of you , I know better.

    Reply

  232. Tina
    January 20, 2014 @ 4:57 pm

    Thank you! I just changed a 9v battery tonight. I went to my bin of new loose batteries, replaced it, then threw the old one in my bin of old batteries ready to be recycled. So I actually have two hazardous battery bins in my house!!

    Reply

  233. Jim Caron
    January 20, 2014 @ 5:06 pm

    Thanks for the tip, and am taping up my batteries as we speak

    Reply

  234. Jeanne
    January 20, 2014 @ 5:08 pm

    Wow – this makes me worry about the battery recycle bucket at work- lord only knows what is in that thing! Thanks for the info!

    Reply

  235. Linda
    January 20, 2014 @ 5:42 pm

    Thank for the information. Looking forward to more good advice.

    Reply

  236. Sharon
    January 20, 2014 @ 5:59 pm

    I had no idea this could happen but I am checking my battery supply and junk drawer right now. Thanks for sharing this vital info.

    Reply

  237. Tina
    January 20, 2014 @ 6:07 pm

    I watched a program that actually showed what can happen even with laptop batteries over time…explosive dangerous things batteries..but at the same time we have to choice but to use them iguess we all should store unused ones properly and get rid of used ones…truthfully no one thinks about this sort of issue until you see what can happen

    Reply

  238. Toodie Laswell
    January 20, 2014 @ 6:13 pm

    I would like to get this information and thanks so much for sharing that

    Reply

  239. Debbie
    January 20, 2014 @ 6:16 pm

    Thank you for sharing . I like you always just throw all my batteries together in one bag , I will never do this again .

    Reply

  240. Janet D
    January 20, 2014 @ 6:24 pm

    Very good info. Had no idea this could happen. I will be doing this to any loose batteries (this type)
    Thank you~
    Janet D

    Reply

  241. Michael
    January 20, 2014 @ 6:35 pm

    9volts can cause serious harm if carried accidentally in your pocket with loose change. I almost found out the hard way just how dangerous. I was at work, at a hotel and was going to change a battery in a smoke detector so I tossed a 9v in my pocket which also included some loose change, mainly pennies, after a short while my leg literally felt like it was on fire! When I reached into my pocket, the 9v was so hot I could barely hold it and it had expanded out where the seam was. Any longer in my pocket, and I’m positive it would have popped! Be very, very careful with anything that holds a charge, even a small charge because if you take these things for granted, you risk the chance of some serious harm.

    Reply

  242. Carol
    January 20, 2014 @ 6:55 pm

    Thanks for sharing this important lesson.

    Reply

  243. Bri
    January 20, 2014 @ 7:08 pm

    Bless you for sharing your story and spreading awareness…

    Reply

  244. Angelica
    January 20, 2014 @ 7:31 pm

    Thank you. Did not know this. I will share with everyone.

    Reply

  245. Leslie
    January 20, 2014 @ 8:35 pm

    Thank you for putting this information out there, and yes I would like to receive notifications of future videos that you make.

    Leslie

    Reply

  246. susan
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:07 pm

    Could you also do one on heaters. I had a heater I plugged into a reg. ext. cord. Took less then 5 min’s to start a fire. I came home and turned heater on and went to the bathroom. Came out and flames already to ceiling. The only thing that saved me was I had a leak in roof and had a pan with water in it. It gave me a little time. Not much time but just enough. Thought I was going to die from the smoke itself. Thank you and God Bless.

    Reply

  247. Sally
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:09 pm

    Thank you for this information. I save my batteries in a plastic coffee can. I will check them now and tape all of them no matter what. I have had a burn on my leg because I was carrying a AAA battery and a penny in the same pocket. That was a real eye opener.

    Reply

  248. Nicoletta
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:13 pm

    Thank you for the message and God bless you and your family.
    Didn’t know this and just realized that I have many batteries loose in a drawer. Going to throw them all out!

    Reply

  249. Kristie
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:31 pm

    Thank you for sharing. Prayers to you.

    Reply

  250. Nova
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:44 pm

    I’m very sorry for your misfortune. I also read that leaving any volt battery loose in drawers are at risk of causing a fire so if you have already opened the new battery package, make sure to store all loose batteries new or recyclable in a plastic container so they do not come in contact with any paper or other flammable object. In the one case I read about, a paper clip was in the drawer and had touched the loose battery causing it to make ignition and flame caught onto the other paper in that drawer. It was your typical ‘junk drawer’ with a little of everything in it; pens, paper, paper clips, batteries, coins, etc.

    Reply

  251. Kimberly Vazquez
    January 20, 2014 @ 9:48 pm

    Thanks for the warning! Please sign me up to receive your videos.

    Reply

  252. Bonnie
    January 20, 2014 @ 10:02 pm

    So glad you , your family AND PETS were not harmed. The information you are providing is very important to everyone and should be shared with ALL. I definitely would like to continue receiving your information.

    Reply

  253. BeachBaby
    January 20, 2014 @ 10:06 pm

    Thank you so much, and I am so sorry for your loss, I needed to chime in, because I have a zippered cloth bag in my master bedroom closet, where my paralyzed spouse and I sleep. In the bag is a medical stimulator it only uses 9v batteries. The company continually sent us 20-30 batteries at a time. There must b 50-60 loose brand new 9v’s in that bag just being moved around from time to time, since ons battery lasts for months. I too have a coffee table with a drawer I toss some 9v’s in for ths kids toys, there are also alot of papers and nail polish remover and spare change, paper clips, ect. I CAN’T THANK YOU ENOUGH FOR POSTING THIS!

    Reply

  254. Marla
    January 21, 2014 @ 7:29 am

    I am so sorry for all that you endured through this experience. I am going to heed your lesson and your obviously heartfelt mission and store our batteries appropriately. With 5 kids we have outrageous quantities of batteries and YES I tossed ’em in a ziplock bag. They are in my linen closet right now. We will have a family discussion and view your video as a family later this evening. Thank you for your message… and a wonderful lesson learned. I am off to scavenge all batteries in the house!

    Reply

  255. Denise Labrecque
    January 21, 2014 @ 9:20 am

    Hello. I want to tell you, Although this has happened to you and your family…and I know you feel responsible, you may also have saved so many lives at the same time.
    This video is a true live saving story.
    Thank you for sharing and please don ‘t feel this is your fault. I had no idea this could happen. I am so sorry for your loss and thank God no one was hurt. Peace, Denise

    Reply

  256. cindy
    January 21, 2014 @ 10:00 am

    wow unreal… thank you for sharing

    Reply

  257. Kim Bextermueller
    January 21, 2014 @ 10:01 am

    Good lesson to learn. I now know how I will be spending my snow day today.

    Reply

  258. Eli
    January 21, 2014 @ 10:01 am

    Watching this today made a huge difference in our lives. Thank you for keeping my babies safe. I can’t wait to share these life lessons with them.

    Reply

  259. Amanda Healey
    January 21, 2014 @ 10:55 am

    I never knew that could happen I am so thank ful I seen it on facebook and I shared it on… I would love to learn more please

    Reply

  260. Mary Barbian
    January 21, 2014 @ 11:04 am

    Very important information!

    Reply

  261. Carla Skrivan
    January 21, 2014 @ 11:09 am

    I would love to read or hear more of your tips. So Happy everyone got out safe. I live close too Hannibal Mo.. thanks for sharing your story 🙂 I also had our batteries stored like this. Not anymore… God Bless you

    Reply

  262. Dave Press
    January 21, 2014 @ 11:10 am

    Most battery packaging warns you to not allow batteries to come in contact with keys or coins for the reasons described above.

    Reply

  263. Ron D
    January 21, 2014 @ 11:20 am

    I realized this problem while with a community theatre group. I was taking care of the wireless mic’s that the actors were using for the performances. These use 9 volt batteries. Well I carried spare batteries in my pants pockets. This worked very well, till, I also had some spare change in the same pocket. Well the terminals got crossed with the money, and the pocket heated up real fast.

    Reply

  264. Ruth
    January 21, 2014 @ 11:58 am

    Thank you so very much for sharing this. I had no idea!! I will be checking on my loose batteries right now that are in my linen closet in a plastic box…………my God…………an accident waiting to happen.

    Reply

  265. Claire and JC
    January 21, 2014 @ 12:13 pm

    THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR SHARING YOUR TRAGEDY WITH ALL. IT IS MOST HELPFUL AND SHOULD BE DISPERSED TO EVERYONE.

    Reply

  266. Pamela Midkiff
    January 21, 2014 @ 1:56 pm

    This was most informative and helpful! I realized I am guilty of the same!!! Lack of Knowledge…so, it is greatly appreciated!!!
    Thank you!!!

    Reply

  267. Eloise Quidachay
    January 21, 2014 @ 3:20 pm

    A Home is Replaceable, A Family is Not. So happy you and your family are saved from this ordeal. And Thank You for sharing a very important information that can and will save more families.

    Reply

  268. Kim Mannetje
    January 21, 2014 @ 4:24 pm

    Thank you for sharing…..I had no idea how dangerous batteries were.

    Reply

  269. Cheryl Banales
    January 21, 2014 @ 4:47 pm

    Thank you for sharing. I had to change one today when I got home because it was beeping and I throw it away. When I watched this I went back and put the black electrical tape on top and around for safe measure. Thanks for saving my family and I.

    Reply

  270. Ellis H Berry Sr
    January 21, 2014 @ 5:28 pm

    Thanks for the imfo.

    Reply

  271. Rosemarie Mance
    January 21, 2014 @ 11:14 pm

    I was clue less about the danger of batteries. In the 1950’s our neighborhood lost 6 school-play mates (ages 4 to 13yr ) from a gas leak house fire. After this tragedy life was never same!
    I will gladly share this info with many others to help your life saving mission!
    Happy your family was saved!
    Thanks much for caring! Rosemarie Mance Pittsburgh PA

    Reply

  272. Callie
    January 22, 2014 @ 5:48 am

    I remember when the home of a (Willamsport, PA) Bell Telephone employee burned
    down because of his electric can opener. I learned from that to NEVER let a can
    opener OR toaster plugged in between uses. A simple little thing like the
    spring inside that activates the appliance becomes weak after repeated use and
    allows the necessary contact to start a fire. He was on vacation with his
    family at the time, but he brought the opener into work and showed everyone.
    The fire marshall told him toasters could do the same thing.

    Reply

  273. Susan Webb
    January 22, 2014 @ 6:44 am

    I have a family daycare and would like all the info that I can get to keep my family and daycare children safe. Thank you. Peace, Sue

    Reply

  274. Carol Satran
    January 22, 2014 @ 10:00 am

    Thank you so much for sharing this valuable information. I also have had the experience of having change and batteries in my pocket and felt my pocket getting hot. Scary experience.

    Reply

  275. Linda Comiska
    January 22, 2014 @ 10:07 am

    Is it just the 9 volt batteries that have to be taped or worry about or any batteries? I recycle all of mine in a plastic bag when it gets full.

    Reply

  276. Darlene Willis
    January 22, 2014 @ 10:09 am

    thank you for sharing this message with me i did not know this but will keep it in mind

    Reply

  277. Nancy
    January 22, 2014 @ 10:54 am

    Thank you for sharing this information. I had never heard this before. Blessings to you and your family!

    Reply

  278. John Moravecek
    January 22, 2014 @ 11:12 am

    Also keep steel wool away from the batteries!

    Reply

  279. Sue
    January 22, 2014 @ 11:26 am

    So, how do we recycle batteries after they are taped?

    Reply

  280. Amy E. Zay
    January 22, 2014 @ 11:44 am

    please register me for your email list!

    Reply

  281. Dee
    January 22, 2014 @ 11:50 am

    Thank you

    Reply

  282. Bonie
    January 22, 2014 @ 11:59 am

    Another thing that a lot of people don’t know is don’t put batteries in a “Junk” draw and then put ANY kind of steel wool in there it will cause an immediate fire to start if they touch! Be safe!

    Reply

  283. Betty
    January 22, 2014 @ 1:08 pm

    I too change the batteries when time changes,but as I did them I put the used in one pocket and went up and down ladder,by the time I got to the 5th smoke detector,I felt a burning against my leg. I jumped off the ladder,reached into my jeans pocket pulled out some very HOT batteries. Lucky I did

    Reply

  284. Rose Wolfensberger
    January 22, 2014 @ 1:16 pm

    we had a fire 1 yr. ago, the printer got hot and we had a whole case of spray paints we just got in front of the printer , I heard popping noises, the cans exploded from the heat and fell into a near by trash can , we didn’t get back in our house for 6 months., also always check your fire ext. to see if it is fully charged, mine was not, no one got hurt , but we did lose 2 birds, I am glad I saw this, I am going to change the way we store batteries now, I sure do not want another fire.

    Reply

  285. Loretta Killian
    January 22, 2014 @ 1:17 pm

    Thanks, and sign me up for updates!!

    Reply

  286. Lesley
    January 22, 2014 @ 1:34 pm

    One time I had batteries in my front pocket for something I was meaning to put them in and I got distracted for a short period of time. All of the sudden they got really hot and burnt me through my pocket. I took them out right away so I was fine, but it happened real quick. They were AA or AAA. I never really put two and two together and figured out why that happened, but now I know! Thank you!

    Reply

  287. Darlene
    January 22, 2014 @ 1:41 pm

    Thanks so much for sharing.

    Reply

  288. esther scherer
    January 22, 2014 @ 2:39 pm

    Thanks for the information, I did not know this!

    Reply

  289. wendy
    January 22, 2014 @ 2:49 pm

    Thank you so much! very informative and thank goodness everyone was ok.

    Reply

  290. Dee H
    January 22, 2014 @ 2:50 pm

    Wow

    Reply

  291. Donna Maguire
    January 22, 2014 @ 3:23 pm

    Thank you for this. I consider myself one who is very careful and take safety very seriously. My house burned down many years ago from another cause. But I did not know about the terminal on the batteries. I have many stored in my house for spares, I will now go and cover them with tape.

    Thank you, and may your life get back to normal as much as it can.

    Reply

  292. Donna
    January 22, 2014 @ 6:53 pm

    Totally amazed. I have batteries in a coffee tin in my garage. Thank you for such valuable safety information.

    Reply

  293. Nicole C.
    January 22, 2014 @ 6:54 pm

    Thank you for this video

    Reply

  294. Lori Keller
    January 22, 2014 @ 7:03 pm

    glad you and your family are ok I had a grease fire in oct I would have never thought a battery could spark that is good info in fact I just went and took all of mine out and put tape on them I had them in a cabinet drawer Thank You and again Glad you and your family were not hurt

    Reply

  295. Christina Tietz
    January 22, 2014 @ 7:10 pm

    Wow! I had no idea that this could happen. Thank you so much for sharing and I am so very thankful you and your family are okay. This story brought tears to my eyes.

    Reply

  296. Yodamom
    January 22, 2014 @ 7:22 pm

    Thank you for this wonderful information. I believe you will save many live and properties

    Reply

  297. Kathy James
    January 22, 2014 @ 7:25 pm

    Thank you! I’m happy that you and your family are all safe!!!

    Reply

  298. Tracy Marie
    January 22, 2014 @ 7:47 pm

    Thank you for this information! Our batteries are all standing upright in a drawer but I would never think about this with the old ones…..I am certain this video will save lives.

    Reply

  299. Don Christensen
    January 22, 2014 @ 8:17 pm

    I am a volunteer fire fighter for a small town in North Dakota and I found your video to be very knowledgable and interesting and looking forward to sharing with our community

    Reply

  300. Mike Richardson
    January 22, 2014 @ 8:39 pm

    About 10 years ago I was getting ready to dj a birthday party. Well I used a cordless mic at the time and wanted to make sure I had enough battery power for the night. So I threw an extra 9 volt battery in my pocket and didnt think much of it. Off and on through out the night I kept feeling this pain in my leg. I would rub my hand over the area and it would stop. At about 9pm I decided I had been using the mic quite a bit so vs taking the chance the batt would die while using it, I decided to change it out for the new one. Well I reached in my pocket to get the battery and felt tremendous heat. The problem was that I hadnt even touched the battery yet. I had touched a nickle in my pocket and it was HOT. I took it out quick and it burned a circle on the wood table the shape of the nickle. LESSON LEARNED

    Reply

    • Lisa
      January 23, 2014 @ 10:38 am

      Mike I dd the exact same thing at work. I changed a battery in a thermometer & stuck the old one in my pocket to later put it in the recycle bin after an half hour my leg was really hot!

      Reply

  301. Amy K
    January 22, 2014 @ 9:16 pm

    Thanks for the info!

    Reply

  302. greevous
    January 22, 2014 @ 9:59 pm

    It’s a tragedy this happened, but this is a case where the green mentality caused you to lose your house.

    Normal 9volt batteries (alkaline) contain almost nothing that’s bad for the environment. They’re made from manganese and zinc. Most places in the USA allow you to dispose of them in the landfill like any other trash. Once upon a time they contained mercury, but they haven’t contained mercury for decades.

    My advise, if you live in a jurisdiction that doesn’t mandate you use special handling, just throw the stupid things away, don’t pack rat them and give them the opportunity to catch fire in the first place.

    Reply

  303. Linda
    January 22, 2014 @ 10:32 pm

    Thank you so much for posting this! As soon as I viewed the video I became alarmed and went to the laundry room in the basement where we have a large ziplock back full of used batteries and found 3 9-volt batteries included in the bag and then while I was looking for electrical tape I found 4 more 9-volt batteries in a bin with a bunch of tools. Yikes! Couldn’t go to bed until this was taken care of. This could have been a disaster ready to happen.

    Reply

  304. Nikki
    January 23, 2014 @ 6:46 am

    This happened to my very best friend. They were cleaning out their basement and found some old batteries. They threw them away (almond with a bunch of other things they were going through) and went to bed. That night they started a fire. The garbage can was right under their sons’s room! My friend’s husband woke up to their dogs barking and smelled a musty smell. He got everyone out just to be safe. He was going to go back in to find the smell when the fire started. They were blessed to survive such a terrible tragedy.

    Reply

  305. Jay Caplan
    January 23, 2014 @ 9:49 am

    This is worth listening to for you, your family and your pets!

    Reply

  306. robin baron
    January 23, 2014 @ 9:49 am

    I cant wait to receive this so my children and I can watch it together,ty

    Reply

  307. Jamie Stein
    January 23, 2014 @ 12:02 pm

    Thank you for the info very useful

    Reply

  308. Barbara FULTZ
    January 23, 2014 @ 1:19 pm

    thank you.

    Reply

  309. AnheuserBuschCU
    January 23, 2014 @ 1:22 pm

    Extremely sad to see that done to someone’s house, but such an important message to share. We will spread the word and hopefully prevent this in the future!

    Reply

  310. Jennifer Fannin
    January 23, 2014 @ 2:01 pm

    My son was carrying 9 volt batteries around in his pocket. They caught on fire! He received small 1st, 2nd, & 3rd degree burns on his leg before his could get his shorts off. What is so amazing is that he was already in the ER sitting in an examine room because he thought he broke his wrist. He was sitting on the bed talking to the dr when flames and sparks started shooting out of his pocket. The dr told us that in his 18 years at the ER he had never seen this happen. We came home and made sure EVERY battery was sitting upright in a cabinet where nothing could connect with them.

    Reply

  311. sue obrien
    January 23, 2014 @ 2:25 pm

    thank you so much, never knew…but makes sense. is it only the 9volt? hope you and your families lives get back on track soon.

    Reply

  312. Jennifer F.
    January 23, 2014 @ 4:50 pm

    Thank you so much! I’m going through the house and guest house collecting all batteries in drawers etc.. I’m also organizing the container of loose batteries I use for the kids toys-2 9v batteries were floating around in there! I’m also covering all the connectors on the big container of batteries waiting to be recycled. So sorry for your home but you have honestly just saved lives! Blessings to you and your family! Thank you!

    Reply

  313. Silvio
    January 23, 2014 @ 5:00 pm

    Have batteries sitting in the house, never thought about this as a hazard issue. Thank you for the wake-up call.

    Reply

  314. Debbie D
    January 23, 2014 @ 5:46 pm

    I too have all my batteries loose in a box in my closet. I’m going to get the electrical tape right now!! Thanks. Glad your family is ok.

    Reply

  315. Laura Piercey
    January 23, 2014 @ 6:55 pm

    Thank you!

    Reply

  316. Gary
    January 23, 2014 @ 7:31 pm

    Hey Everybody! Forget all the tape and other packaging ideas. The simple solution is to get a plastic bucket and fill it part way with water. Take your batteries and throw them in the bucket of water. The water will short the terminals and discharge the battery completely. The water will protect the bucket and surrounding environment. Then recycle. Trust me, I’m an electrician.

    Reply

    • Nancy
      January 24, 2014 @ 8:24 am

      Gary I like your solution and I plan to add water to my battery recycling jug. I am just concerned that if these old batteries are sitting in water for a period of time, do they ooze and contaminate the water? If so then it is counter productive to pour contaminiated water off into soil. Thanks for the idea. STAY SAFE!!!

      Reply

  317. Tricia McCullough
    January 23, 2014 @ 9:14 pm

    My house caught on fire and burned down from a flower pot on my front porch. This was was from potting soil from the year before bought at Walmart. It caused spontaneous combustion. People should know of this as well.

    Reply

  318. ken
    January 23, 2014 @ 9:47 pm

    Thank you for sharing. I just went around the house and collected more than 30 old batteries floating around in drawers and boxes waiting to be recycled, including a few 9v. I had no idea!

    Reply

  319. Pei
    January 23, 2014 @ 11:13 pm

    Thanks!

    Reply

  320. Claude Slagenhop
    January 24, 2014 @ 4:46 am

    Thank you for the info. You don’t recycle alkaline batteries. Throw them in the trash. You recycle NiCad or other rechargeable batteries.

    Reply

  321. Teresa Lamb
    January 24, 2014 @ 5:48 am

    Thank you I never knew that. I will pass that information along.

    Reply

  322. Teresa Lamb
    January 24, 2014 @ 5:49 am

    Thank you. That was a good tip because I never knew that. I will tell others.

    Reply

  323. Janet
    January 24, 2014 @ 5:55 am

    Thank you for sharing. Glad your family & pets are ok !

    Reply

  324. stan
    January 24, 2014 @ 6:40 am

    thanks

    Reply

  325. Amy Ferguson
    January 24, 2014 @ 6:47 am

    I learned this lesson as I was cleaning my house. I was picking up/cleaning and found a 9 volt battery. I put it in my pocket and intended to put it away when I got to that part of the house where batteries go. My (metal) keys happened to be in that pocket as well. I didn’t think anything of it. Then a few minutes later my leg was on fire (not literally) but it hurt. I couldn’t figure it out, but franticly got the objects out of my pocket to see what was going on. I was shocked! That battery was really hot! I figured it out. Great lesson you are sharing. I had no idea until that happened to me.

    Reply

  326. Dawn-Mari
    January 24, 2014 @ 6:50 am

    I use the plastic containers with the snap lids. They are the same size as the batteries so they fit in just like the packaging. The end terminals won’t never touch. And I store them with the lids on and stacked. I use only rechargeable batteries and keep them stacked on a shelf in my office. Not in a drawer. They are kept air and water tight.

    Reply

  327. Faith Hart
    January 24, 2014 @ 7:17 am

    You will be hard-pressed to find somewhere to recycle regular Alkaline batteries anymore. Because these regular batteries no longer contain mercury, most city recycling centers are no longer accepting them. There are no stores I know of in Chicago that accept Alkaline batteries. The city used to partner with the Zoo, with the libraries and with Walgreens, but no longer. They tell you to throw them out. However, Rechargeable batteries MUST be recycled, as they are still very toxic to the environment. I believe Home Depot does accept them. I take mine and ones collected at our condo to the city’s recycling center. I take CFLs to Home Depot.

    Reply

  328. ShelleyRae
    January 24, 2014 @ 8:55 am

    The city of Minneapolis takes batteries as part of the recycling program. But I had never heard to take this precaution. We are told to put them in a clear plastic bag on top if the recycling bin. Makes me wonder if they ever get hot bouncing around in the truck all day. I’m going to figure out how to get this video to them, so they can update the instructions.

    Reply

  329. klschams@yahoo.com
    January 24, 2014 @ 9:40 am

    So sorry for your loss. Big thanks for helping others.

    Reply

  330. Todd Reeder
    January 24, 2014 @ 9:45 am

    I have done this long before i saw this video because i know it could happen. I contacted the local recycling center and asked about where to take light bulbs that contain mercury. They didn’t know of any place. I have seen people put florescent tube bulbs out wit there garbage. And the garbage hauler just throws the lights in garbage truck. That is against the law because they contain mercury. The closest place i found online to take florescent bulbs containing mercury is about 50 miles from me. So I would have to drive a total of 100 miles just to get rid of the damn things.

    Reply

  331. Debbie Reynolds
    January 24, 2014 @ 10:08 am

    Good info

    Reply

  332. Marisol Rocha
    January 24, 2014 @ 12:18 pm

    Thank you so so much for this invaluable information. I am greatly interested in getting alerts on more informative videos.

    Reply

  333. charles
    January 24, 2014 @ 12:46 pm

    thank you for the tip

    Reply

  334. Bonnie
    January 24, 2014 @ 1:36 pm

    Thanks SO much for sharing this urgent message – I have emailed all my family and friends the link,
    and collected all loose batteries in our house. Please add our email to your list. What a blessing that your whole family, including pets, were kept safe and sound – by the Lord!

    Reply

  335. Kim
    January 24, 2014 @ 1:50 pm

    After watching this I reached over to the drawer in my office where I keep our batteries. I have a bag of them that need to be recycled. There were four 9V batteries and about 15 AA or AAA all in the bag together. Two of the 9V’s were actually touching opposite terminals of each other. I’m so thankful that you shared this video. I have never heard of this before and will definitely tape them now. I am a single mother of 3 and you may have just saved my home or my family. Thank you so much!!

    Reply

  336. Patricia Scott
    January 24, 2014 @ 2:38 pm

    Thank you for sharing this. I have a family and pets and friends that I am going to make watch this because I never want to see anything happen to them. Also I did not know about placing tape on unused batteries I did like you and stored them in a bag in my garage. I am now changing that habit. Thank You so much. And I am sorry for your loss..

    Patricia.

    Reply

  337. SLG
    January 24, 2014 @ 3:12 pm

    Don’t bother to recycle consumer alkaline batteries. The alkaline is actually beneficial in landfills, where it helps buffer the acidic leachate. The batteries are made of zinc, manganese dioxide and potassium hydroxide, none of which are considered toxic pollutants for a landfill. For information on how to dispose of other types of batteries, see http://www.wikihow.com/Dispose-of-Batteries .

    Reply

  338. nila oni
    January 24, 2014 @ 3:15 pm

    like to see the video…
    God bless

    Reply

  339. Jerry
    January 24, 2014 @ 3:25 pm

    So what to do with non-recyclable used batteries?
    Many stores that sell batteries, phones or electronics will take used batteries back for recycling. Visit http://www.call2recycle.org to find a retailer near you that will accept them.
    — OR —
    Visit http://www.Earth911.org or call 1-800-CLEANUP to learn about local battery recycling
    opportunities.
    All you need is your zip code.

    Reply

  340. sue obrien
    January 24, 2014 @ 4:00 pm

    Thank you so much for trying to keep other people safe. I wish you and your family well.

    Reply

  341. Judie Westfall
    January 24, 2014 @ 5:23 pm

    Thank you for wanting to keep others safe from hard!!

    Reply

  342. Gary D.
    January 24, 2014 @ 5:51 pm

    Can you please recreate the events in a controlled environment. Exactly the contents of the bag and surrounding environment. Being an Electrical engineer it is hard for me to grasp that a batter of such low amperage can cause a chain reaction without a catalyst. Thanks, Gary D.

    Reply

  343. Mary
    January 24, 2014 @ 7:02 pm

    This is very scary, so I would like to see any of the other videos.so sorry this happened to you and your family.

    Reply

  344. Justin
    January 24, 2014 @ 9:34 pm

    Probably best to just wait until the battery is dead…the smoke alarm will chirp to let you know. Then you won’t have to throw a bunch of half-used batteries in a bag. Taped or not they still pose a threat as they still have corrosive acid in them. Or as, the electrician Gary stated, put them in water to safely fully discharge them.

    Reply

  345. Richard Benjamin
    January 24, 2014 @ 10:00 pm

    Alkaline batteries contain no hazardous chemicals. They should be put into the trash immediately upon removal and should not be stored for any time. They will deteriorate and cause chemical burns, so get them out ASAP. Rechargeable batteries are the ones that need to be recycled because they do contain hazardous materials and should not go into landfills. Check your local businesses for recycling. My store, a hobby shop, deals in rechargeable batteries and we accept dead ones for recycling for free.

    HobbyTown USA, Frederick MD

    Reply

  346. stacey olsen
    January 24, 2014 @ 10:55 pm

    Thank you!

    Reply

  347. Kent Johnson
    January 24, 2014 @ 11:41 pm

    Thanks for this important information, I am going out tomorrow and buy a couple of rolls of electrical tape!

    Reply

  348. My
    January 25, 2014 @ 12:51 am

    I never though of that! Thank you for sharing and glad your family and you are safe. No one answered the question of the recycle bins being a hazard. Is it because only batteries are in there and no conductors like foil gets thrown in. It sounds like all the places mentioned don’t recycle regular batteries. How about Walmart?
    Thank you! And yes I’d like more videos.

    Reply

  349. Kay
    January 25, 2014 @ 5:49 am

    Great information. Please also address the situation with Lithium batteries. I bought a digital camera so I can just change the batteries and avoid the hassle of dealing with connections with electrical power overseas and chargers. Therefore I carry a couple of extra Lithium batteries with me in a plastic bag ALWAYS when I travel. Any suggestions to make this safer? I have noticed that the post office now asks if you have dangerous items in packages you are mailing and they have added lithium batteries to the list.

    Reply

  350. Laurie Anello-Vail
    January 25, 2014 @ 6:06 am

    Thank you

    Reply

  351. Tom Nash
    January 25, 2014 @ 7:20 am

    This isn’t just for storing them. I was changing out the batteries in the smoke alarms in my house and as I removed one I slipped into my pocket, finished putting the new one in and the little cover back, folded up the ladder and moved to the next smoke alarm. Setup my ladder and felt something warm on my leg. When I reached in my pocket the battery had shorted against a coin and was so hot it was uncomfortable to hold. It took all of about 3 minutes.

    Reply

  352. Stefani
    January 25, 2014 @ 7:45 am

    I keep my batteries in the freezer to extend their life until I use them and the old until I recycle them.

    Reply

  353. Nancy
    January 25, 2014 @ 7:54 am

    Great information, Thank you for sharing. Please add me to your email list.

    Reply

  354. Maggie Raigner
    January 25, 2014 @ 7:57 am

    Thank you for the lifesaving information. Please, add my email to your list!

    Reply

  355. nstaichman
    January 25, 2014 @ 8:22 am

    Thanks for what you’re doing!

    Reply

  356. Carolyn
    January 25, 2014 @ 8:36 am

    Thank you for caring and sharing your story and for spreading awareness . . . also thank you to every reply that contributes other ways this terrible destruction can happen. I believe I have been very lucky and blessed to not have any such happenings because I am definitely guilty of all of the above. Changing my battery storage & disposal ways. I recycle everything possible, only I don’t know of any place to recycle batteries. Sad because there is a machinery battery manufacturer in my town. One would think they could reuse/renew what’s inside regular batteries to help keep their costs low. I believe I will try to contact them to get a recycle program started, but I fear they will argue that this type of battery does not apply to their manufacturing process or that it would cost them more money to do such operation rather than to continue with their current processes. Has anyone figured out where daily use batteries can be recycled? Too many replies here to read through and find. Perhaps an email from David to all replies to inform us? Our Wal-mart does not have a battery recycle spot that I’m aware of but I will ask & get back here to inform if they do.

    Reply

  357. Alfred Lievertz
    January 25, 2014 @ 8:52 am

    Two points:

    It is nice that we change smoke detector batteries twice a year but that does not mean that they are used up by any means. I use these batteries as my alarm clock back up batteries after I take them out of the detector. No need to toss them if you have other applications.

    The other point is not really a point but if you want to see the power of ‘used’ 9 volt batteries, there are Youtube videos of people who have linked together many 9v batteries and then connected the ends to show how much power is still left in the large set of batteries. Here is the link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hwLHdBTQ7s

    Reply

  358. Doug
    January 25, 2014 @ 10:46 am

    I worked as a safety engineer and this is very important information.

    Reply

  359. Laurie Pappas
    January 25, 2014 @ 10:51 am

    Well, you may have saved us… I have our old batteries in a bag, in our bathroom closet. I could just as easily have had this happen to us. Please don’t blame yourself; I have never heard this before. And thank you for getting the word out.

    Reply

  360. Anne Galinsky
    January 25, 2014 @ 10:52 am

    I really appreciate this information as I have always been incrdebly cautious when it comes to replacing batteries in my smoke detectors. We lost a very close friend at 10 years old because of a house fire. Her aunt started a foundation 12 years ago that eduactes people on fire safety. I am going to forward this to her. I have never heard of this happening. This should be part of a nationwide effort to educate people about this. Everybody has batteries lying around their house in drawers. Thank you so much!

    Reply

  361. Mary
    January 25, 2014 @ 11:48 am

    I had AA’s in my hoodie pockets along with several quarters and they came close to setting me on fire.

    Reply

  362. Denise
    January 25, 2014 @ 12:19 pm

    I was aware of this but not about the tape. Thank you so much for sharing this message so I can pass it on to others. Very sorry about your home. Praying for your self-forgivness and your family!

    Reply

  363. Rosemary Latuns
    January 25, 2014 @ 12:39 pm

    very interesting. Glad everyone is fine.

    Reply

  364. Mandy Thode-Sturges
    January 25, 2014 @ 12:53 pm

    Thank you for this priceless information. Happy to hear your family is safe.

    Reply

  365. Sharon
    January 25, 2014 @ 1:07 pm

    This is very important information. I look forward to future tips.

    Reply

  366. Joan Sconzo
    January 26, 2014 @ 12:13 pm

    I look forward to future safety tips

    Reply

  367. Denise Salvaggio
    January 26, 2014 @ 12:26 pm

    I’m very interested in more info! I just ran to the drawer I keep extra batteries in because I just keep them in a box all together. They are not deprecated and could roll around 🙁 I had no idea- thank you so much.please send me more info.
    Denise

    Reply

  368. Joseeph
    January 26, 2014 @ 12:58 pm

    Crazy! I was just dealing with my recycled batteries and thought exactly what this guy is talking about – what if the 9v battery shorted on another battery in the bag? I ended up putting tape over the terminals before putting them away.

    Reply

  369. diana hersh
    January 26, 2014 @ 4:12 pm

    thanks for sharing!

    Reply

  370. Marie Robbins
    January 26, 2014 @ 4:59 pm

    Thank you for sharing that info on the batteries…I have always kept my batteries in a sealed plastic bag in my refrigerator… I have done that for 18 yrs…was told that it keeps them longer and I don’t think they will catch fire in the fridge.

    Reply

  371. Nancy Haberland
    January 26, 2014 @ 6:57 pm

    Thank you for sharing this. Be safe.

    Reply

  372. Cindy Lee
    January 26, 2014 @ 10:20 pm

    WOW! I am so very sorry for your loss – a terrible tragedy, however your most important possessions (your family and pets) were physically unharmed, and hopefully the mental anguish that you all have experienced will disappear as time goes on. In the meantime, please know just how many people and their families have already been helped by your video! What a remarkable idea, and we’re all so grateful that you have taken the time to share with us.

    One request: IF you should happen to decide to make your videos available to people in Canada, PLEASE be sure to include me in your mailing list. I would sincerely love to share this video as far and wide as possible. It would be a terrific video to share with schools, libraries, fire departments, etc. etc. I can’t think of anyone that would not appreciate this information. Thank you for making this terrible experience into a positive one for the rest of us! God Bless You! xo

    Reply

  373. Vivian Mario Gunter
    January 27, 2014 @ 1:08 am

    thank you for sharing the safety tip

    Reply

  374. CHUCK
    January 27, 2014 @ 1:12 am

    OK, LET’S GET THE ELECTRONICS THEORY CORRECT ! IT IS A LACK OF RESISTANCE THAT CAUSES THEM TO OVERHEAT AND CATCH FIRE! NO RESISTANCE MEANS A DEAD SHORT. AS THE RESISTANCE GOES DOWN, THE CURRENT FLOW GOES UP, MORE CURRENT FLOW, MORE HEAT! AIR IS A GREAT INSULATOR, AS IS ELECTRICAL TAPE. THE BETTER THE INSULATOR, THE MORE THE RESISTANCE, AND THUS, LESS CURRENT FLOW, AND LESS HEAT! IT’S THE DIRECT SHORT–NO INSULATION (NO RESISTANCE TO CURRENT FLOW) THAT CAUSES THE FIRE!

    Reply

  375. Theresa
    January 27, 2014 @ 12:14 pm

    Please send out more life saving info. It may save many lives. thank you.

    Reply

  376. Martha
    January 27, 2014 @ 12:52 pm

    Thank you! I will make sure to share this info with my family and friends.

    Reply

  377. nana
    January 27, 2014 @ 2:18 pm

    thanks for sharing

    Reply

  378. Margo Bailey
    January 27, 2014 @ 6:48 pm

    Thank you for telling us about the batteries

    Reply

  379. Terri
    January 28, 2014 @ 4:33 am

    I didn’t know this! WOW. Could have easily happened to me. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply

  380. jeffb
    January 28, 2014 @ 1:47 pm

    thanks for sharing this it is now being circulated round the GB. via retired firefighters network.
    Thanks.

    Reply

  381. Nathalie LaPlante
    January 28, 2014 @ 7:52 pm

    Thank you for sharing!

    Reply

  382. Roxanne Swope
    January 28, 2014 @ 10:16 pm

    Wow. Great information. After watching, I went to check the new batteries we have in a box, some of which are loose. I found a 9 – volt battery where the bottom end had exploded open. Whew…needless to say.

    Reply

  383. RG
    January 29, 2014 @ 1:23 am

    My local ACE hardware will accept all batteries for recycling.

    Reply

  384. Helen Morrison
    January 29, 2014 @ 12:32 pm

    Glad you’re all safe..and thanks so much. Our local hardware store takes all kinds of batteries.
    Thanks for your ‘mission’. helen

    Reply

  385. Jack
    January 29, 2014 @ 4:20 pm

    Good job for sharing. Take care and keep it up. Hope you get a good insurance comp.

    Reply

  386. Dale Gittins
    January 31, 2014 @ 10:07 am

    WOW, Very scary!! I already knew some of the dangers from those type of batteries considering I have one in my survival kit with tape on it since I have steel wool separate from it.

    Reply

  387. nancym
    January 31, 2014 @ 6:34 pm

    There seems to be a lot of conflicting information here about battery disposal. I would suggest that it probably depends on exactly how your local city/county/district or whatever disposes of trash in general. I called my county agency one time because I was confused about changes in the pickup bins and how they had changed their labeling for various recycling materials. They told me that most of the garbage that is picked up for my area is now disposed of by burning in a special plant, not stored in a landfill. Most plastics, glass, cans, and paper and cardboard were still recycled and the bins were for that use. Later I saw on their website that it was no longer necessary to recycle ordinary household batteries that were made after a certain date, and that these can be tossed in the trash.

    So I wonder if the different sets of advice here may depend on whether the primary method of garbage and trash for your area is burning or landfill. My understanding for my area is that these small AA, etc., (non-rechargeable I guess) can be thrown in the trash because they do not end up in a landfill. They are not burned in a open dump, but in some kind of disposal plant. And likewise, I don’t know of any place around my area that accepts these types of batteries for recycling.

    Still, I know I have at least a few 9-volts sliding around somewhere here at home, and this video was certainly a wake-up call about the danger from those. So I will be sure to tape those right away! Thank you for creating this warning video.

    Reply

  388. Linda Sain
    February 1, 2014 @ 12:42 am

    Thanks for the information.

    Reply

  389. Tami McGrew
    February 1, 2014 @ 3:58 pm

    Thank you for sharing this important information. I did not know and am so thankful I now do. So sorry about your losses. Good for you for turning it around for good!

    Reply

  390. Sue Anderson
    February 2, 2014 @ 10:44 am

    please sign me up thank you

    Reply

  391. CHULA GUNAWARDENE
    February 3, 2014 @ 11:12 am

    This story is relevant but not exactly the same.
    Battery of my Glucometer was running law and I took it to the shop in the next city by train keeping it my shirt pocket. On my way back I had it my shirt pocket and felt something strange hotness in my chest. I immediately took the battery out of my pocket and found it is getting hotter and hotter every minute passed. Fearing to leave it on the train I kept it juggling in my hands until reach the next station. At next station I ran out from the train and threw it into the river .
    My question is why it got hot while it was in my pocket?

    Reply

  392. Jack Bradbury
    February 4, 2014 @ 9:05 am

    this is mostly alarmist material. My company recycled over 500,000 pounds of household batteries last year. We collect the batteries by having collection tubes placed in cities, libraries, hospitals, businesses, grocery stores, anywhere handy for people to leave their waste batteries. So all of these batteries are collected together, touching contacts, unprotected. Have we experienced fires? Explosions? Even heat? NO……………..nothing. EVER.
    The US Department of Transportation conducted tests with dozens of batteries in parallel and heat was not generated.
    Alarmist posts like this do nothing but encourage people to throw batteries in the trash where they do the real harm by leaching corrosives and heavy metals into the groundwater.
    Get some sense people!
    and regarding the video at the start of this post, I’m sure it’s made with good intention, but the family that made it don’t know what kind of batteries they were using. It makes a difference! Alkaline won’t cause a fire unless you combine it with steel wool or some other fine wire. Lithium batteries can generate heat. So insulate (tape) your lithium batteries and don’t waste a moment of your life worrying about the other batteries.

    Reply

  393. Jason
    February 6, 2014 @ 3:55 pm

    That was a life saving video there. How many of us dispose of batteries daily without realizing what we are doing wrong.

    Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

  394. Jessie
    February 7, 2014 @ 1:39 pm

    I would like further videos on this topic. Thank you so much for this help.

    Reply

  395. Jessie
    February 7, 2014 @ 1:40 pm

    I would like future information and videos on this topic. thank you so much for changing negatives into a positive.

    Reply

  396. Elva Y. Derby
    February 9, 2014 @ 2:34 pm

    I’m very sorry about your loss-I’m very thankful that you have taken the time to do this video for us-I for one did not know this about the batteries-but I have quite a few of them-now I will go check them-thank you very much-hope everything works out for you to rebuild your home-

    Reply

  397. Miles Lowe
    February 9, 2014 @ 9:11 pm

    Good tip , I would a another wrap of tap so the ends don’t loosen . Thanks

    Reply

  398. Sharon
    February 17, 2014 @ 5:10 am

    Yes, I’m interested in your other tips offered. Thank you!

    Reply

  399. Gene Greeson
    February 20, 2014 @ 4:03 am

    Here’s one. This has happened both to me and a friend. We both had to learn the hard way not to place batteries in our pocket that also has change. This can make for one hot leg!

    Reply

  400. Jack Bradbury
    February 25, 2014 @ 1:19 pm

    there’s a fair amount of misinformation and misinformed opinions here.
    1) please recycle all batteries; alkaline, rechargeable, you name it. The reason some cities and states advise dumping alkaline batteries in the trash is because they can’t afford to pay for the recycling and the manufacturers haven’t come to the table to pay the tab……….yet! Batteries all have certain things in common: they are all non-biodegradable, contain heavy metals and contain electrolytes that can contaminate ground water. Used battery waste is far worse for the environment than paper, plastic and glass, so recycle them. If you think it’s OK to dump them in the trash, put your alkaline batteries in a glass of water for a week and then have yourself a nice refreshing drink, because that’s exactly what you do by dumping them in the trash.

    Reply

  401. Jack Bradbury
    February 25, 2014 @ 1:25 pm

    Next chunk of misinformation is regarding flammability of household batteries. In Dave’s video he specifies that two 9volt batteries caused his fire. He doesn’t know what kind he used, whether it was lithium or alkaline. I asked him. I would assume if his fire indeed was caused by batteries, it was lithium. I process over 500,000 pounds of alkaline batteries a year and they come in uninsulated and we never experience fires, explosions, heat generation, etc. We advise people to tape lithium batteries but ignore the rest of the household batteries. The US DOT requires all lithium batteries as well as batteries OVER 9 volts to be insulated. No need to freak out. If you want to address this issue further, my email is: jack@allbatterysalesandservice.com

    Reply

  402. GramaSugar
    May 4, 2014 @ 9:41 pm

    Thank you Jack for all your information. I was freaking out till I read all your posts.

    Reply

  403. Suzie
    May 7, 2014 @ 9:16 am

    I was at a water park and put my cell phone in a locker. I made the mistake of placing a pair of shorts, tank top, and sunscreen (which came in an aerosol can) in the locker as well. Forty-five minutes later, I returned to check for messages. The battery to my cell phone had melted; it melted through my phone and the cover of my cell was melted and extremely hot. The sunscreen had burst and the shorts/tank top were ruined with oil/chemical stains and the fringes on my pockets were black (instead of tan). Upon leaving, I advised an employee of what happened; he was surprised but did not think anything needed to be done. I think a warning sign should be posted on the lockers. These lockers were located outside-making the temperatures even hotter inside the locker. Also, there are several styles of shorts that have metal buttons/zipper/designs on pockets that could ignite when mixed with head phones/ipads/ipods which contain batteries; the lockers themselves are metal. To what extreme should we be concerned? I am going to write the park a letter and explain to them what happened to try to prevent this from happening again. We are so thankful this did not cause a fire. Also thankful it did not explode upon opening the locker which could have caused burns. Would not want this to happen to someone else….

    Reply

  404. Kathy Guenette
    July 25, 2014 @ 12:59 am

    Just want to thank you for sharing this effective and very h

    Reply

  405. Kathy Guenette
    July 25, 2014 @ 1:06 am

    I want to thank you for sharing this very effective and real life video of your experience and encourage you by saying your message is spreading. My husband and I own a property Restoration business and deal with home fire losses often. I am now using your video to help train my staff and also share it with customers WTO help educate them in fire prevention for their future.

    Reply

  406. Loic Brun
    September 26, 2014 @ 2:23 pm

    Wow! You are truly a kind man. Even at such times, you didn’t forget to help others by giving important tips about fire safety. I am speechless and sad at the same time for what happened. This post will surely keep countless of people informed and educated when unexpected situations happen. Thank you so much for sharing your video!

    Reply

  407. Mark Anderson
    December 31, 2014 @ 4:38 pm

    Thank you so much for spreading the word about these battery dangers. I am so saddened to learn that you lost your home. If I had the money to buy you a new home, just like the one you lost, I would do it in a heartbeat. You are a man with a heart filled with amazing kindness. To be able to create a fire safety video and post it to the Internet just days after you lost your own home is absolutely awe inspiring. Without a doubt your video will save other people from going through the same terrifying experience that you endured, and I can only imagine how many lives your video will save as well. Thank you so very, very much. May you and your family have all the best that life has to offer this coming new year and every year!

    Reply

  408. Ben Candelaria
    February 13, 2015 @ 9:06 am

    I appreciate this informative video. This is something I feel most people may not even think twice about. It is always great to see people passing on knowledge with the intention of keeping others out of harms way.

    Reply

  409. Brian
    February 17, 2015 @ 4:22 am

    I arrived at this website because I was trying to figure out why a bunch of coin and button batteries that I placed all together in a plastic bag were starting to heat up to the point that the bag was getting too hot to touch and was starting to melt. Another chilling coincidence, April 21 is my birthday. Thank you so very much for this informative video. I’m glad your family is safe, and it’s not your fault.

    Reply

  410. Robin
    June 14, 2015 @ 2:09 pm

    We came upon this video after doing research on how to store batteries after our own home fire two days ago from a lithium battery heating up and actually popping, causing a fire in our battery drawer. We believe the fire was caused by a similar reaction where a positive and negative side of the batteries were inadvertently connected through the jumble in the disorganized drawer. Fortunately I was in the room when the fire started and we were able to put it out very quickly with minimal damage. We were VERY lucky and the “what if” scenarios keep me up at night. We, like the gentleman in the video are on a mission now to inform everyone of the dangers of storing batteries. It is something you never think would happen to you, but the potential danger is right there in your junk drawer.. Please take a moment to properly store and dispose of your batteries. And spread the word to your friends and loved ones.

    Reply

  411. therese
    September 4, 2015 @ 2:05 pm

    think you

    Reply

  412. therese
    September 4, 2015 @ 2:05 pm

    this helped me on my science project

    Reply

  413. Denise
    October 5, 2015 @ 6:22 am

    Oh my. This is sooo good to know. After watching this I’m definitely changing how I recycle and store my batteries!!!

    Reply

  414. Robert Light
    December 23, 2015 @ 5:46 pm

    This is a bit scary. I am checking my batteries now.

    Reply

  415. John Towler
    December 15, 2016 @ 10:32 am

    This morning we had an incident which caused me to search online and arrive at this blog. In our case we just avoided a tragedy by finding a small smouldering fire in a plastic basket that we used to hold our supply of batteries kept in a kitchen cupboard. It looks as though it was caused by a CR2032 lithium button cell which ignited. The metal case of the battery was damaged, (I don’t know how, maybe in shipment or in storage), which I believe caused an internal short circuit. We were VERY lucky that the fire didn’t cause a chain reaction and spread. The lesson here is to make sure that your button cells are protected from mechanical damage and kept separately in a metal container. PHEW!

    Reply

  416. RROSE
    January 2, 2017 @ 3:45 pm

    I found this post researching WHY an AA BATTERY got real HOT with a distinct Fire-Cracker smell as I was changing the battery on a string of Christmas lights a few days ago. It was quite concerning.

    I had no idea little batteries could cause fires!!

    This is what I since learned:
    Any batteries, AA, AAA, new or used, can HEAT if metal touches BOTH ends (positive/negative connection). The metal conductor can be a piece of tin foil, a coin, steel wool, a foil candy wrap, a paper-clip, a copper wire, even the exposed wire in a garbage twist-tie, the metal coil on spiral bound note book, a metal pen, a metal screw driver, a nail, a metal flash-light, ANOTHER BATTERY OR even a DVD!! If the battery gets HOT enough it can catch fire especially if a flammable material is near (paper bag, tissue paper, note paper, business card, ad flyer, paper tag, cardboard, wrap paper, Kleenex, TP, paper-towel, napkin, tin can, keys, flameable materials, clothes, scarves, plush toys, cloths).

    Did U know batteries are to be stored standing upright??

    Here is a link on reported car fires, house fires, caused by AA batteries!! VIDEO demo HOW is attached to one of the articles. Read them all. Very informative. It’s astonishing we haven’t been warned B4. Even rechargeable batteries are dangerous. One kid’s rechargeable toy burned four houses including the little boy. Another was a DVD stored in a car with a single AA battery. THE car burned and the garage. LISTED ALSO is how to store, where to store, how to dispose, batteries: GOOGLE

    are aa batteries a fire hazard

    Fire Alarms use 9 Volt batteries, even more dangerous because both ends are on top, near one another. Dispose and Add tin foil or foil wrap, even an ice-sycle from a Christmas tree, or fumes from a jerry-tin of gas stored for snow-mobiling and Also click here:
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/taber-gardner-fire-family-1.3912849

    Reply

  417. Samuel
    February 24, 2017 @ 2:33 pm

    Thanks so much for sharing this video

    Reply

  418. CJ Tuttle
    April 29, 2017 @ 9:24 pm

    Wow! This is such a sad thing to have happened. But thank you so much for sharing. This is honestly something that has never crossed my mind but I am so thankful that I came across it today. I’m going to have to share this with the rest of the family.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.